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Microsoft updates sabotaged my program

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  • #41
    John,

    No need to make folders and there is a DAYNAME$ function.
    Just giving some options here. The /D was added to the XCOPY command to avoid copying an unchanged file.
    It would be better to pass a single string to shell xcopy.

    I shell to a batch file with XCOPY commands in it so multiple copies can be added by the user. PAUSE is added at the end to see any error.
    Not sure why the need for a daynumber when a subfolder for a week could be copied over (saying that is what you are doing?)

    Code:
    FUNCTION PBMAIN () AS LONG
     LOCAL Daynumber,Async,ShowWindow AS LONG
     DayNumber  = 7
     Async      = 1
     ShowWindow = 0
     CopyIt DayNumber,Async,ShowWindow
    END FUNCTION
    
    SUB CopyIt(DayNumber AS LONG,Async AS LONG,ShowWindow AS LONG)
     IF Async THEN
      Async = SHELL (ENVIRON$("comspec")+ " /C xcopy /D/E/R/Y *.* D:\"+DAYNAME$(0)+DATE$ + "\*.*",ShowWindow)
     ELSE
      SHELL (ENVIRON$("comspec")+ " /C xcopy /D/E/R/Y *.* D:\"+DAYNAME$(0)+DATE$ + "\*.*",ShowWindow)
     END IF
    END SUB
    Last edited by Mike Doty; 17 Aug 2019, 09:14 AM.
    https://duckduckgo.com instead of google

    Comment


    • #42
      Originally posted by Rodney Hicks View Post
      Well, I don't know how this feature applies to security, but for a long time my monitor shut down when I used to go get a cup of coffee. I eventually dug around and found the setting that triggered that 'security' feature and shut it off. Three days ago, after an update, and after years of my computer behaving, -staying on when I was gone for less than a minute, that feature returned to the original setting and now shuts off if I get up to get a coffee. What's going to happen if I quit drinking coffee?

      Calling these updates security updates doesn't make them security updates, and Microsoft's concept of security leaves me insecure. If they can reset my settings, than anybody with a mind to can do the same. I think there is a whole different purpose behind the security updates that we are left unaware of, and quite possibly these updates may merely be providing MS with a means to bend me and other users to their will.
      Not every update is is a security update. And turning the screen of is an energy saving option, which has been a part of Windows for a long time. There's this thing called "Climate Change", ya know. Every single Watt not consumed helps.

      But I very much agree that it is very annoying that MS resets certain settings with each feature update.

      Comment


      • #43
        And turning the screen of is an energy saving option, which has been a part of Windows for a long time. There's this thing called "Climate Change", ya know. Every single Watt not consumed helps.
        Not denying the existence of 'Climate change', nor am I blind to light pollution but when a program is running and producing screen changes and the monitor shuts down because there's no input from the user during the program flow, it impedes the process of development. P.S. I don't need a big brother to shut down my machine when I'm perfectly capable of shutting it down myself if I'm not going to be using it.

        Besides, when all the planets are warming, as indicated here, then my monitor isn't going to make a difference, nor will all the monitors together be of significance.
        Rod
        "To every unsung hero in the universe
        To those who roam the skies and those who roam the earth
        To all good men of reason may they never thirst " - from "Heaven Help the Devil" by G. Lightfoot

        Comment


        • #44
          Originally posted by Rodney Hicks View Post
          but when a program is running and producing screen changes and the monitor shuts down because there's no input
          Unfortunately, MS made equally stupid choices in the Inactivity Logoff. Client reported their IT staff set the logoff after 2 minutes inactivity. Long running jobs that manipulate indexed files across the network were being 'killed' at 2 minutes because people started the job then went to get coffee / potty / whatever. Resulted in large swaths of corrupt files and indexes. Great idea!

          Comment


          • #45
            I should be clear. I am not 100% against updates. When Windows Vista came out, I bought a machine with it installed, and admittedly the first six months were shaky, but after that and using their updates, I never had problems with Vista itself. I see no improvement with Win 7 over Vista, which doesn't mean I don't see differences, I just don't see improvement. As for windows 10, I have no knowledge except for what I gleaned from how long and well my daughter cursed. It scared me off.
            Rod
            "To every unsung hero in the universe
            To those who roam the skies and those who roam the earth
            To all good men of reason may they never thirst " - from "Heaven Help the Devil" by G. Lightfoot

            Comment


            • #46
              Originally posted by Rodney Hicks View Post
              I should be clear. I am not 100% against updates. When Windows Vista came out, I bought a machine with it installed, and admittedly the first six months were shaky, but after that and using their updates, I never had problems with Vista itself. I see no improvement with Win 7 over Vista, which doesn't mean I don't see differences, I just don't see improvement. As for windows 10, I have no knowledge except for what I gleaned from how long and well my daughter cursed. It scared me off.
              Rodney
              Here is a hint
              Never be the first person to do an update - always be second. That rule was formulated by me when I had my own computer company in about 1988!
              [I]I made a coding error once - but fortunately I fixed it before anyone noticed[/I]
              Kerry Farmer

              Comment


              • #47
                The most appealing thing for me about Windows 10 is that I got it over four years ago and Microsoft has not made a brass farthing out of me since and probably never will. I have had to restore a full backup pushing double figures in that four years which I never had to do with Win7, WinXP and Win98 but, hey, it is great value for money. I have a full backup done every morning at 04:00 when both I and my machine are asleep which took 3 minutes and 10 seconds to do earlier today, so I couldn't care how often it packs up.

                Go for it Rod, Win7 is destined for the knacker's yard this coming January. I didn't like Win10 for about 6 months, but then I did not like Win7 for about 6 months and did not like WinXP for about 6 months, but they all grew on me. Security pundits reckon that Win10 is the most secure OS that Microsoft has ever produced. A few years ago I had a Linux box for about 12 months and I hated it with a vengeance.

                Comment


                • #48
                  He he, I told you that you are more patient than I am. A year or so ago I needed a dedicated backup box so I hunted up an older Intel board, disks and memory and built the bare box. Tried one after another Linux network backup packages and they all failed for some reason after another. After uttering some purple prose that you could not repeat here, I hunted up one of my old XP copies and installed it on the box, removed any network protocol that was not needed and set it up as a dedicated backup box only accessible from my local LAN. Had to do a patch for a known security problem and configure my Win 10 64 pro to talk to it and BINGO, it works perfectly. It is turned off most of the time and only accessed when I need to get something from it or add something to it so even if I have missed something with XP in terms of security, its really hard to hack a box that is not turned on.
                  hutch at movsd dot com
                  The MASM Forum

                  www.masm32.com

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    Originally posted by Steve
                    its really hard to hack a box that is not turned on.
                    Just make sure that you close your curtains when you turn it on.

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      It is turned off most of the time and only accessed when I need to get something from it or add something to it so even if I have missed something with XP in terms of security, its really hard to hack a box that is not turned on.
                      When Windows 10 came out I bought a machine with Win 7, had all the updates to that point in time installed at the shop, brought it home, disabled wifi on it, and it will never be connected to any network. Loaded about 6 programs that I use frequently and some that I had coded previously and since then I rarely move material from it to my connected pc, and never the other way around.

                      Not that I'm paranoid or anything!
                      Rod
                      "To every unsung hero in the universe
                      To those who roam the skies and those who roam the earth
                      To all good men of reason may they never thirst " - from "Heaven Help the Devil" by G. Lightfoot

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        David,

                        You would probably like it, its a small can that only has a power code and a network cable, I can plug a screen keyboard and mouse into it but I normally run it via VNC and the only thing I have to do to run it is go where the can is and turn it on. When I have finished with it, I just turn it off from my main box via the VNC screen.

                        When the NBN high speed network became available, the new router had a USB port and I had an old SSD disk of about 250 gig doing nothing so I plugged it into the router and have an extra remote drive to dump things onto, easier than the backup box but nowhere as large storage.
                        hutch at movsd dot com
                        The MASM Forum

                        www.masm32.com

                        Comment


                        • #52
                          Originally posted by Steve Hutchesson View Post
                          Tried one after another Linux network backup packages and they all failed for some reason after another.
                          A couple years ago I bought a Synology disk enclosure and I have to admit that the bundled pc backup software works pretty well. There's a client agent to install, but it doens't have too big a footprint.

                          Real programmers use a magnetized needle and a steady hand

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            Originally posted by Stuart McLachlan View Post
                            > the entire execution was sent flying off to an entirely different aspect of the code.

                            ???
                            Something else has to be wrong. No way is a Windows update going to change the logical flow of a compiled program.
                            Go Stuart

                            May I add...

                            Never ever ever blame the operating system or the compiler for your problem.

                            Firstly you are probably almost certainly wrong (personal blood on the floor, decades of experience speaking).

                            Secondly such an accusation/mindset blinds you to the possibility that you might be in the wrong and you do not look as hard as you might and your attitude is negative and closed.

                            When you do think you have found such an unlikely error then simplify the code to the nth degree. Try and have two versions - be able to say 'version A works, version B does not work'. By that stage you have almost certainly realised that it was indeed your error after all.

                            THEN you have to stand up and say out loud so everyone can hear 'I blamed the OS /the compiler and I WAS WRONG'.

                            After you have done that 100 times, my son, you can call yourself a programmer.
                            [I]I made a coding error once - but fortunately I fixed it before anyone noticed[/I]
                            Kerry Farmer

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                            • #54
                              If you have been writing Windows software for 25 years or more you will have seen some OS blunders in either the documentation or the API actual function and while it is relatively rare, it does happen. Back in the Win98 era I wrote a complete set of in memory dialog templates where the Microsoft documentation was simply wrong and using that data produced the "Black screen of death", not the pretty blue one but instant black screen.

                              There were errors in the alignment data and as you could imagine, it was a genuine joy to develop with a reboot and OS repair each time you tested something. When Microsoft introduced UNICODE they also re-wrote any of the API functions that used string data and things that worked correctly before sometimes crashed. The lesson here is ALWAYS write API functions according to the documentation and your code will work on all OS versions (unless you try to use a later API in an older OS version).

                              Exception occur with badly documented API functions, the aforementioned in memory dialog code and another that I have had to do some "interesting" work with, richedit 2/3 which does not suffer the documentation problem at all as the documentation is almost non existent. Richedit has some very useful features but it as buggy as hell and takes many work arounds to make it reliable.
                              hutch at movsd dot com
                              The MASM Forum

                              www.masm32.com

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                All,
                                I have also produced the "Black Screen" but it goes away once I wiggle the mouse. The Black Screen would show itself on a RichEdit control when Shift or Control commands up/down were sent via SendInput and the Keyboard Shift or Control buttons were also pressed at the same time the command was sent. For me I would not say that was a RichEdit problem; merely a programming hurdle to deal with.

                                NOTE:
                                If you do not consider the shift key being down initially and just send off the Shift Up code segment then after a few tries the screen will go dark for a few seconds. To avoid the screen blanking issue the code determines if the shift key is already down and just sends the VK_Up command.

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  I think you will find that killing Win9x stone dead is a different phenomenon to a coding error using a rich edit control. I found by accident that you can kill Win10 64 bit Pro stone dead as well but I will not tell anyone how.
                                  hutch at movsd dot com
                                  The MASM Forum

                                  www.masm32.com

                                  Comment

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