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  • Awesome & Congratulations!!!!

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    • Originally posted by JR Spikowski View Post
      The transition from the desktop to a web browser based cloud is more of a concern for developers then the Windows 32 vs. 64 bit debate.
      I think so too.
      Fredrick Ughimi
      www.meganetsoft.com

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      • Originally posted by JR Spikowski View Post
        The transition from the desktop to a web browser based cloud is more of a concern for developers then the Windows 32 vs. 64 bit debate.
        My take on this is that it's both a concern for (desktop) developers and their guilt. (I need to add that I'd switch the emphasis to "web browser based" cloud, see below for as to why)

        "To the web" seems to be the battle cry everyone is yelling. Without considering if it makes sense for the application. Here's a hint: web applications work for consuming data, i.e. reports.But they're a great PITA for producing anything. From my own terrible user experience, I'd enact a universal law, requiring that those who turn their desktop applications into web applications must under any circumstance exclusively use the web-based version of their software, so that they can feel the pain themselves. Failing to do so will result in immediate extermination. (I'm looking at you, Office 365 developers ...)

        Simple rule of thumb: if an applications is used more than ~ 15 minutes a day, turning it into a web application reduces productivity.

        The cloud itself isn't the problem, IMHO. It's just a bull**** bingo fitting buzzword for the server part in what's known as client/server architecture for decades. It does provide improvements, i.e. greater flexibility, over running the iron(s) yourself, but - as the AWS outage a few days ago has demonstrated, it also has drawbacks, if used incorrectly.
        Last edited by Adam J. Drake; 4 Mar 2017, 04:57 PM.

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        • As a turbobasic user through to PB10 My thanks to Vivian and all the folks (gary, Eric etc.) keeping PB alive and kicking and now there is a future to look forward to. I'll not put any requests, just leave to the new owners to surprise and delight us.
          Alan
          http://www.allthingsspiny.co.uk

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          • Originally posted by Anne Wilson View Post
            Thank you Phil, we really do need a new 64bit compiler. It does not matter if the new compiler can only do the minimum code like dialogs and arrays.
            After more than a few million lines of PowerBasic coding, it would be an arduous task for us to convert these code to another language.
            I second this motion.

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            • That's right, 64bit is the only way forward for PB

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              • Creating and maintaining a professional compiler is probably one of the most complex computing task. It's not a one day job. Bob Zale spent most of his life writing and refining his compiler. I hope there will be a future for his fabulous compiler. There are so many talented programmers all over the word. I hope that "Drake software" will find the right people to maintain and update this exceptional piece of software. My best wishes to the new owner.
                Jean-Pierre LEROY

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                • The cloud itself isn't the problem, IMHO. It's just a bull**** bingo fitting buzzword for the server part in what's known as client/server architecture for decades.
                  Microsoft is abandoning the local desktop and having you rent another copy remotely. Subscriptions are the trend for commercial software.

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                  • Originally posted by JR Spikowski View Post

                    Microsoft is abandoning the local desktop and having you rent another copy remotely. Subscriptions are the trend for commercial software.
                    As my t-shirt says, "There is no cloud. It's just someone else's computer". The theory that cloud lets you flex your capacity up or down is of use to a small subset of companies. Terminal Services, the use of remote desktops hosted on a shared, probably virtualised, platform is of more use but regardless of where Windows resides and regardless of whether that's owned or rented, companies still need apps to do the work. Office 364 or Google docs are merely a rented copy of office or open office running on someone else's computer. If a company or user has the need for a specific program for a specific task then there is still a need for PB and its ilk. Given PB's speed and efficiency, it suits a lot of "big data" situations very well but given the low low price of RAM nowadays, the ability to use more of it for processing that Big Data is a key element for growth in the PC userbase in my opinion. Because there's nothing stopping anyone running a PB app in the cloud.
                    Neil Croft (cissp)

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                    • I would not lose too much sleep over Microsoft's latest attempt to find a money spinner, they lost the goodwill of their client base years ago and only hold their PC market by leverage marketing. Portable gadgets are where Microsoft desperately need to make a hit but the market simply does not trust them and none of them have been a success. Every person they p*ssed off in the past will use something else if they can, so many people who once used a PC from home are happy enough to use an Android tablet or smart phone and they don't have to put up with Microsoft at all.

                      Steve Ballmer did to Microsoft what neither Apple nor Linux could do, damaged their market with bad policy and threw away their market position with the average punter. Sad to say Apple are far too expensive and only really cater for a vertical market and Linux desktops are that clunky that users still generally prefer Windows.
                      hutch at movsd dot com
                      The MASM Forum

                      www.masm32.com

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                      • Steve Ballmer did to Microsoft what neither Apple nor Linux could do, damaged their market with bad policy and threw away their market position with the average punter. Sad to say Apple are far too expensive and only really cater for a vertical market and Linux desktops are that clunky that users still generally prefer Windows.
                        Steve Ballmer will be Bill Gates greatest management choice failure. Why Microsoft let that clown stay so long is beyond me.

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                        • I do 99% of my PB programming for back-end processes on web, cloud, and now, IOT applications. I've been doing this for over 10 years. There is a great future for PB beyond the desktop. As long as you have a Windows server it works great.

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                          • Microsoft is abandoning the local desktop and having you rent another copy remotely. Subscriptions are the trend for commercial software.
                            FWIW ... in 1995 or 1996 shortly after I returned to Wisconsin, I attended a Microsoft-sponsored event in Waukesha WI focused on an "exciting new technology."

                            I still have and use the ".NET" Tee-Shirt they gave all attendees.

                            At that time it was said in so many words that .NET was created to aid in the development of "Software as a Service" (without the current sexy "SaaS" label), which MS believed was the future.

                            So "Microsoft abandoning the desktop" and "software by subscription" are hardly new phenomena.

                            MCM
                            Michael Mattias
                            Tal Systems Inc.
                            Racine WI USA
                            mmattias@talsystems.com
                            http://www.talsystems.com

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                            • ActiveX didn't work out as a browser standard either. Creating standards shouldn't be limited to Microsoft products to gain any traction in the industry.

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                              • Script BASIC runs on anything with a C compiler. Would that be considered a standard BASIC language?

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                                • @John:

                                  Is there a 64 bit interpreter available for ScriptBasic. I don't find any references to such.

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                                  • Congratulations to the Drakes. Great news. Thank you Vivian for your persistence and patience.

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                                    • Originally posted by Andy Anderson View Post
                                      @John:

                                      Is there a 64 bit interpreter available for ScriptBasic. I don't find any references to such.
                                      This is something to get you started and I'll check my Windows 64 bit dev box for a later version. I haven't spent much time with Windows 64 bit as there didn't seem to be that much interest.

                                      Script BASIC Windows 64 bit

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                                      • Thank you very much, John.

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