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Over 98% of All WannaCry Victims Were Using Windows 7

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  • Over 98% of All WannaCry Victims Were Using Windows 7

    Looks at this, it is time to upgrade to Windows 10

    https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/new...ing-windows-7/

  • #2
    Originally posted by Anne Wilson View Post
    Looks at this, it is time to upgrade to Windows 10

    https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/new...ing-windows-7/
    Only Windows 7 without available security updates. A lot of the infected computers were pirated copies of Windows 7 that were not eligible for security updates, many of them in China and Russia

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    • #3
      I still use Windows 7 Pro - up-to-date and with additional protection The reason being that it allows me to have an XP environment where I can retain access to a number of heritage applications that won't run under Win10. (Oh, and I can still run the loved classic PB/Dos.)

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      • #4
        I won't want to part with Windows 7 Pro it is the best of all windows

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        • #5
          The only reason why my 6 core Haswell box is running the retail version of Windows 10 Professional is because I could not buy another copy of Win 7 64 bit Ultimate. The copy I do have lives in my last i7 quad core which still runs perfectly as I blocked the attempt to force the upgrade to Win 10. Be careful what you wish for, Win 10 64 bit is a bad mannered pig that dumps junk in your boot drive daily, it is subject to repeated modification by Microsoft including changing your settings and to keep it in usable condition, you have to be very up to date in how to keep fixing it. If it ever breaks which can be done, the Microsoft solution is like Win 3.0/1/11, reinstall Windows, an appalling nonsense in this era.

          As far as security, run anything that does not require Microsoft updates, I personally use MalwareBytes as scan on demand only, the only new software I ever install on it gets run through my Win 10 64 bit box first and if you are stupid enough to open unknown email attachments, you deserve to get your box trashed. The solution to getting your box trashed (after looking in the mirror and repeating "I am a moron" enough times) is to maintain a boot disk image that is garranteed clean of any virus/trojan/rootkits as this can beat anything, no matter how nasty it is.

          I currently keep Acronis which does auto backups so if I ever get a problem, I can fix it using an Acronis boot CD. If you have anything worth saving, plonk it on another machine or portable can and don't leave it turned on. You cannot get an infection from a device that is not turned on. Disk space is not a big deal any longer so backing up entire partitions is no big deal, I have a USB3 plugin can that has my complete Win7 64 box content backed up as well as my last Core2 quad box that had XP SP3 running on it.

          I learnt this lesson back in 1998 when I had a 4 gig SCSI that did not start one morning and had to hunt up everything I could find from my web site, things I had left on friend's computers and had to rewrite many of my tools which was about 3 months work.
          hutch at movsd dot com
          The MASM Forum

          www.masm32.com

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          • #6
            I see absolutely no reason to "upgrade" to Win 10 it seems to offer no advantage - that is not contempt prior to investigation, I installed it and tweaked it so that the UI looked like Win98 and at that point saw no reason to continue.

            If you backup your data to an external device something like wannacry is just a pain and no real drama - you have to spend 15 minutes Ghosting (yep, still use Ghost) your last good image and then an hour or two or maybe more, installing updates and reconstructing your data drive which you kept strictly separate from your data drive.

            Maybe I'm just an old fogy but I think the Win98 UI was one of the few brilliant things to come out of that massive organisation. Actually I'm such a stick in the mud that I won't update to 64bit until a significant number of apps are 64biy only - only one that I use is VidCoder.

            I know that uSoft have all the money in the world but they must have taken a bit of a hit over the last few years, 3 major products that made little or no money - Vista, Win8 and Win10 (lots of installs but not so much money).

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            • #7
              James, have a look at ClassicShell. It least you tweak the UI pretty much to your liking. I settled with the W2K-flavored and been using it with Win7, Win10, Windows Server 2008 & 2012. It even solved an issue with the original Win10 install, where clicking the Start button didn't do anything (a common thing back then, if you google for it).

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              • #8
                @Knuth. I've been using ClassicShell (thats how I tweaked Win10) since it was in beta. I use it primarily with 7 but it seems to work just as well with 8 and 10. Super product and the price is right.

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                • #9
                  I have to wonder how many of those windows 7 systems that where infected where being run as an administrator account and not as an user account.
                  p purvis

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                  • #10
                    For those who are a fan of XP, I have recently built a NAS box with one of my old copies of XP, got rid of that horrible bubblegum interface and installed a Microsoft replacement called Zune, hunted up the SMB1 patch to avoid WannCry and turned everything OFF that I did not need. It sleeps most of the time unless I want to dump something onto it but it has no software that calls back to home and it blocks any incoming non LAN network connections. I installed MalwareBytes but it finds nothing and I have it set up for on demand scanning only.

                    Worked out a cheap NAS box as I used a heap of my old junk, 4 disks, 2 x 2tb and 2 x 1tb, one of the 1tb disks has the OS, the rest (5tb) is for storage. Had an Intel board that has a 2.4 gig Core2 quad installed and its an OK box to use.

                    I only access the box once it is turned on with a password protected TightVNC which is also very useful if I want to find only a few files. I made the mistake of trying out some of those awful Linux NAS packages but as usual the documentation was lousy, some of it crashed during installation so I went back to XP and all is well.
                    hutch at movsd dot com
                    The MASM Forum

                    www.masm32.com

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                    • #11
                      I'm putting an XP VM on my next Windows 10 box so I can retire a bit more hardware. It will be used for occasional support tasks. Won't be browsing the internet with it.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Steve Hutchesson View Post
                        I made the mistake of trying out some of those awful Linux NAS packages but as usual the documentation was lousy, some of it crashed during installation so I went back to XP and all is well.
                        I have to admit, we installed FreeNAS on some old hardware at work to kick the tires, having not looked at such things for a long time. I was pleasantly surprised at how well it worked and integrated. We haven't put any production traffic on it (as I said, old hardware), but I'd certainly consider it for a home network. Also, the latest edition of the OS Synolgy uses on their kit is a joy to work with, and the boxes aren't terribly expensive.

                        Real programmers use a magnetized needle and a steady hand

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                        • #13
                          SME sever and don't look back.
                          https://wiki.contribs.org/Main_Page

                          Please consider a donation if you use this.

                          like anything else. There should be some getting to know how's if you want to get the utlitmate out of your software or hardware. this is what we are using for business servers only. I have never lost a file on a easy to run raid server.
                          USB 3 is still the fastest transfer rate if you like local hardware addins which this is not.
                          This sotesre easily runs on a VM.
                          If a hardware machine goes down you can just transfer the hard drive and except for changing to a new network card setup. You off running in less that 30 minutes.
                          p purvis

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