Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Some work for MCM or other cobol literate programmers

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Some work for MCM or other cobol literate programmers

    Seems like there is a shortage of cobol programmers

  • #2
    Well that says a lot.
    It says that either COBOL and the machines theyr are running on are very dependable

    OR

    Somebody is getting paid for slow equipment and somebody is getting kickback dollars mucho.
    p purvis

    Comment


    • #3
      They would do well by re-writing all of this old junk into something that is easily maintainable by people under 70 years of age. The problem would be that they would probably write it in JAVA or some other nonsense.
      hutch at movsd dot com
      The MASM Forum

      www.masm32.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Hey Steve

        I am over 70

        in 1971, I would have bowed to no one in the world over my COBOL knowledge!!!!

        I wrote my first COBOL program in 1968. Its program code was RC04 (useless information!). It printed out the rate demands (I do not know what you call them - local government property related bills) for Christchurch, New Zealand. They were the first computerized rate demands in New Zealand. Interestingly, we changed from sterling (pounds. shillings and pence) to dollars and cents at the same time - so computerization was a real advantage.

        However, I know I have moved on. I suspect that COBOL has moved on as well.

        Old junk indeed!!!!



        Kerry
        [I]I made a coding error once - but fortunately I fixed it before anyone noticed[/I]
        Kerry Farmer

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Carlo Pagani View Post
          Seems like there is a shortage of cobol programmers
          More about this at IBM:Also the German IT news portal Heise.de reports the shortage of COBOL programmers:Nearly 50 years before, when I have written my first COBOL program I couldn't imagine that this language would outlast half a century.

          Albert
          „Let the machine do the dirty work.“
          The Elements of Programming Style, Brian W. Kernighan, P. J. Plauger 1978

          Comment


          • #6
            ????
            Is there a shortage of COBAL programmers, or of data entry operators familiar with COBAL systems?

            Do they need new program code to enter new data?

            Bugs weren't wiped out 20 years ago?

            Hard coded payment amounts/rates?

            Operators mess up archive copies of programs?

            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            If it still works, keep it.

            If it requires that much maintenance, dump it.

            Even on really well built old hardware, the maintenance contract cost would buy two or three new systems. (IMO of course)
            Dale

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Albert Richheimer View Post
              Nearly 50 years before, when I have written my first COBOL program I couldn't imagine that this language would outlast half a century.
              Fascinating Albert!!! I was a professional fulltime computer person with 7 years experience. I was a COBOL expert and a manager of a computer bureau (remember them?). I deliberately left the computer industry in 1973 because I thought that my expertise would not last my working lifetime. In 1977, I 'came back' to computing where I stayed for 20 years.

              Your comment resonated with me - big time.

              Kerry



              [I]I made a coding error once - but fortunately I fixed it before anyone noticed[/I]
              Kerry Farmer

              Comment


              • #8
                Now come on guys, REAL MEN[tm] programmed in FORTRAN.
                COBOL was for the sissies.

                Memories of long ago when a company I worked for had an IBM System 360 with an amazing 64k of core storage, hard disks that were 8 foot tall and massive tape drives. The really exciting gadget was this 6 foot wide printer that used to pelt invoices out the top faster than the folded paper would handle. It had a rotating chain of characters that performed impact printing which I don't remember seeing much later when most went to dot matrix printers.

                I confess to having been far more interested in the punch card operators but it was an interesting time when companies in the 1960s spent into the millions on hardware like this. I inherited a Sinclair z80 in about 1980 and had a floppy of BASIC to play with but did not start seriously until 1990 with MASM, Microsoft BASIC and Microsoft C version 6. That i486 was an atom cracker in its time.
                hutch at movsd dot com
                The MASM Forum

                www.masm32.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Actually Steve, I would have thought based on your many posts, that real men programmed in machine language.

                  My first program was in Fortran on an IBM card machine - you will remember the model but I do not.. A 670?????

                  But I then became a professional programmer using ICL (was ICT) Plan which was essentially a machine language level program - although it did have a few macros (but hey, I knew what machine code those macros generated - of course)

                  Because in those days, you only got one compile a night, the trick was to write code with no coding errors.

                  But a successfully compiled machine level language has more errors than a successfully compiled COBOL program. The rules and structure of a COBOL program meant that if you weeded out all the compile level errors, there were less errors in the running program. This was one of the big advantages of COBOL.

                  I distinctly remember the first COBOL program I compiled. It had 1600 errors. We stood around and said 'this COBOL will never catch on!' It was 1968.
                  [I]I made a coding error once - but fortunately I fixed it before anyone noticed[/I]
                  Kerry Farmer

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Same here: "I confess to having been far more interested in the punch card operators"
                    Fim Wästberg

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      In 1981, I taught myself FORTRAN and COBOL on the IBM 3081 using the VM/CMS operating system. I've not used COBOL in over 30 years, so my knowledge of it is, to say the least, rusty. I suspect the reason all these systems still run COBOL is the same reason as when everyone asked this question during the pre-Y2K panic: because they are relatively stable (which businesses love), and because they are large, extensive, and pervasive, which will make them VERY expensive to re-write in a "modern" language (which businesses hate).

                      Meanwhile a fun link for us old-timers:
                      https://web.mit.edu/humor/Computers/real.programmers
                      Real programmers use a magnetized needle and a steady hand

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Back in the 90’s I was doing some clipper & dbase programming for a local Bank. I got roped into helping with their Saving Cobol code. That system was 1000’s of small batches some dating to the mid 1960s; each batched work on the output of the ones before. New features of Cobol were glued into new in-between batches. All of the data was flat-file fixed field. My job was trying to decode what each batch did and help with documentation.
                        BASIC shampoo - DO:LATHER:RINSE:LOOP UNTIL CLEAN <>0

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A simple Google Search for CONVERT COBOL:
                          to Java
                          to c#
                          to python
                          copybook to json
                          copybook to sql table
                          data types to sql
                          to sql
                          copybook to xml schema
                          to c# online free
                          copybook to exel

                          I'll have you know that when I was working with FORTRAN I was also the punch card operator. Ha Ha

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jim Fritts View Post

                            I'll have you know that when I was working with FORTRAN I was also the punch card operator. Ha Ha
                            So you will know how to put those little divots back into cards when you punch the wrong thing????

                            [I]I made a coding error once - but fortunately I fixed it before anyone noticed[/I]
                            Kerry Farmer

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Cards were cheap. I just punched another card.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                We were not allowed to use the automatic card punches that the punch girls used (forgive the ancient sexism and ageism, but that is what we called them)

                                So we used a hand punch. It was very slow. And it was much faster to fill a few wrong wholes than punch a whole new card.

                                We had no other way of upgrading source code.
                                [I]I made a coding error once - but fortunately I fixed it before anyone noticed[/I]
                                Kerry Farmer

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Kerry Farmer View Post
                                  We were not allowed to use the automatic card punches that the punch girls used (forgive the ancient sexism and ageism, but that is what we called them)
                                  So we used a hand punch. It was very slow. And it was much faster to fill a few wrong wholes than punch a whole new card.
                                  This brings up some memories from 1973, when I was traveling around in Switzerland, visiting branches of a Swiss bank in order to test and implement software on their ancient main frames (built in 1962). We were only allowed to do this during the night shift, from 10:00pm to 06:00am. At some shops we have had UNIVAC 90-column cards. Those allowed typos to be corrected, because the card were finally punched in one single "thump", after setting up all 90 characters in both rows.

                                  Strangely I managed to remember the syntax of the UNIVAC assembly language during sleep: A fellow programmer dictated line for line some new program subroutines, and I was operating the card punch. The next morning I didn't recognize these program parts, albeit I have punched those into cards. Obviously, I was more or less asleep, but still managed to type meaningful code

                                  Albert.
                                  „Let the machine do the dirty work.“
                                  The Elements of Programming Style, Brian W. Kernighan, P. J. Plauger 1978

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Hi All

                                    Learning COBOL and Fortran, what would be the best weblinks for tutorials on these languages?

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Tim
                                      Learning COBOL and Fortran, what would be the best weblinks for tutorials on these languages?
                                      You will need to read Latin first.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I am on 'How-To Geek' mailing list and just got this link: What is COBOL, and Why Do So Many Institutions Rely on it?

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X