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4k monitor for a non-gamer

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  • 4k monitor for a non-gamer

    Will a "standard" video card work fine with a 4k monitor if I'm not gaming?
    Anyone using a 4k monitor just for regular desktop use?
    It seems to be the standard for new monitors.

  • #2
    Shawn, the only real requirement is your video card needs to be able to drive 3840 x 2160. I have a Viewsonic 15883 (VG2860mhl-4K) driven with my AMD FirePro W600 and it works just time for development and watching HD YouTube videos. At 4k the default fonts are a bit small, even with my computer glasses, but I like the screen real estate. This setup replaced my three 1920x1200 HP monitors and I don't miss them much after getting used to keeping the monitor closer than I used to.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Shawn Anderson View Post
      Will a "standard" video card work fine with a 4k monitor if I'm not gaming?
      The monitor should be able to display at lower resolutions if your video card does not support higher ones.
      Showing lower resolutions doesn't seem to ever be a problem, though the point of greater detail is lost.
      The world is strange and wonderful.*
      I reserve the right to be horrifically wrong.
      Please maintain a safe following distance.
      *wonderful sold separately.

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      • #4
        I think you'll find that any modern video card will support 4k. The NVIDEA card in my #2 machine cost $60 new and it supports dual 4k. I use it for graphics not gaming, so a low-end card worked fine.
        "Not my circus, not my monkeys."

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        • #5
          thanks everyone

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          • #6
            I have been using a 32 inch LG monitor and the eye strain has been terrible because it is very glossy. LG 32MA68HY.
            Last visit to eye doctor wasn't good.
            I have tried turning down all settings and it is still like a mirror.

            I'm looking for computer glasses over glasses and screen filters, but a better monitor for the eyes is a must.
            I have a much older acer x233H monitor to the right of it and there is no reflection coming back so switching them around to see if that helps.

            Any suggestion on monitors to reduce eye strain would be greatly appreciated (4K not needed, but ok if better.) This is for programming.
            Might even look at All-in-one computers at Best Buy or Nebraska Furniture Mart.

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            • #7
              Any specific reason you are choosing 4K over something else? There are plenty of monitors that will suit at a FAR cheaper price point. Unless you plan on getting a REALLY large monitor and the extra pixel density is just so it doesn't look pixelated.

              4K monitors are quite expensive and only fit a specific niche of people, i.e. people doing photography/video, need really high pixel density, or plan on getting a monitor larger than 35" inches. You'd almost be better off getting two cheaper, but good quality monitors then a 4K one.


              Obviously only you know your need.
              <b>George W. Bleck</b>
              <img src='http://www.blecktech.com/myemail.gif'>

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              • #8
                Don't need 4K

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                • #9
                  I've been using a Samsung 32" LED monitor (S32D850T) for about a year at a resolution of 2560x1440. The only problem I seem to have is screen saver synchronization with my Dell laptop using the DisplayPort interface (monitor periodically goes to sleep when I'm using the keyboard/mouse). It's only annoying, but I may switch to DVI and separate audio interface to see if it clears up. Otherwise, it looks GREAT and gives me a ton of screen real estate. A bonus is that you can set it up for PIP with an second HDMI input (cable, satellite).

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                  • #10
                    Is it matte, glossy, reflective?

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                    • #11
                      For example... here is a large selection of decent monitors that are cheaper than most 4K

                      https://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...WS&PageSize=36
                      <b>George W. Bleck</b>
                      <img src='http://www.blecktech.com/myemail.gif'>

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                      • #12
                        It isn't about price. It is about eye strain and glossy. Samsung https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=bnav_se...words=S32D850T
                        Multiple models of the same model.

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                        • #13
                          Samsung is a matte finish - no glare from desk or ceiling lights. I also don't need 4K (video from HDMI input still looks great). Note that the monitor has no speakers - which is not a problem for me since I use external amp/speakers.

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                          • #14
                            If eye strain is your problem you do NOT want a 4k monitor for your primary, or everything will look like this.
                            "Not my circus, not my monkeys."

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                            • #15
                              I see your point. Blue-light free, matte.

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                              • #16
                                In recent years I have been using a 40"-class 1080p Sony TV for my primary monitor. Relatively inexpensive, and it has a "computer mode" that turns off all of the dynamic picture adjustments.

                                Eliminating light sources behind you is important for glare of course, as well as lights in your peripheral vision. Part of the reason I like working in the early-morning hours, nice and dark.

                                "Not my circus, not my monkeys."

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                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Eric Pearson View Post
                                  In recent years I have been using a 40"-class 1080p Sony TV for my primary monitor. Relatively inexpensive, and it has a "computer mode" that turns off all of the dynamic picture adjustments.

                                  Eliminating light sources behind you is important for glare of course, as well as lights in your peripheral vision. Part of the reason I like working in the early-morning hours, nice and dark.
                                  I don't have any task lights. All light shines back indirectly from the ceiling, and window is at right angle to monitor.
                                  The world is strange and wonderful.*
                                  I reserve the right to be horrifically wrong.
                                  Please maintain a safe following distance.
                                  *wonderful sold separately.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    This wasn't for me. My brother has 3 large monitors on his desk. He wants to replace them with a single large 4k for some reason.
                                    My question was whether a run of the mill video card would work OK as long as he's not gaming.

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                                    • #19
                                      Shawn, that's exactly what I did (replace three 24" HP LA2406 monitors with a single 4k monitor). You just need to check the monitor specs (e.g., 4096 x 2160 or 3840 X 2160) and find a graphic card with similar specs. If you're not doing heavy graphics (gaming), even a lower-priced card would probably work fine if the specs match.

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