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Microsoft plans to completely drop support for x32 in Windows Core 10 OS

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  • Microsoft plans to completely drop support for x32 in Windows Core 10 OS

    Microsoft plans pure x64 OS for next generation.
    https://www.golem.de/news/windows-co...01-132427.html
    --Theo Gottwald
    ------------------------------------------------
    76706 Dettenheim * Germany * info@it-berater.org
    ------------------------------------------------
    Joses Forum * Theo's Link Site * IT-Berater.org

  • #2
    And it will be a non starter, just the same as their last attempt.

    Discussed recently here: https://forum.powerbasic.com/forum/u...134#post769134

    Comment


    • #3
      Windows Core is not aimed at mainstream desktops. Core is a stripped-down version of the OS, more of an offshoot for devices than "the next generation of Windows". No?

      Not even Paint and Notepad are going to work on a system running Core, so users will have no expectation of running "normal" Windows programs.
      "Not my circus, not my monkeys."

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Eric Pearson View Post
        Windows Core is not aimed at mainstream desktops. Core is a stripped-down version of the OS, more of an offshoot for devices than "the next generation of Windows". No?

        Not even Paint and Notepad are going to work on a system running Core, so users will have no expectation of running "normal" Windows programs.
        Windows 10 IoT Core is a version of Windows 10 that is optimized for smaller devices with or without a display, and that runs on both ARM and x86/x64 devices. Windows 10 IoT Core utilizes the rich, extensible Universal Windows Platform (UWP) API for building great solutions.
        https://developer.microsoft.com/en-u...xplore/iotcore
        The world is strange and wonderful.*
        I reserve the right to be horrifically wrong.
        Please maintain a safe following distance.
        *wonderful sold separately.

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        • #5
          So Windows Core is basically the replacement for Embedded XP, just that it also runs on ARM CPUs?

          Comment


          • #6
            I am with Stuart here, another Microsoft flop in the making.
            hutch at movsd dot com
            The MASM Forum

            www.masm32.com

            Comment


            • #7
              PowerBasic Inc should take the hint and place the 64bit compiler on the front burner, as sooner or later the wolves will come
              and we didn't cry wolf for no reasons. It is not too late, and that you would need expertise to do your compiler it is best to bring
              in external help like Charles Pegge of OxygenBasic.

              Like the saying "You can't remove your own appendix, you would need a surgeon"

              Comment


              • #8
                Like the saying "You can't remove your own appendix, you would need a surgeon"
                Sorry, it has been done.

                https://www.theatlantic.com/technolo...ppendix/72445/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Dennis, it is only one single case in the world, and that soviet man is a fully qualified and experienced surgeon !

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    a
                    Originally posted by Anne Wilson View Post
                    Dennis, it is only one single case in the world, and that soviet man is a fully qualified and experienced surgeon !
                    Evan O''Neill Cane

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      What we experience: The Windows train is splitting. There will be a group of users who will continue to use x86 programs. But, a large group of users do not need x86 programs. Especially not, if the system runs much better without x86 support. Would be nice if there soon PB64. I do not want to hear/read anymore that PB64 is not needed.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I do not want to hear/read anymore that PB64 is not needed.
                        I'd rather not see it either way!

                        We will get, what we will get, when we get it.

                        Either Drake Enterprises is working on it, or they are not.

                        64 bit coming (more than it already is) needed or not to keep the manufacturing chain moving. I don't need BS stories about the end of 32 bit. It will end when market dries up (whether MS likes it or not).

                        The debate is pointless and just plain irritating.
                        Dale

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bernhard Fomm View Post
                          What we experience: The Windows train is splitting.
                          I'd argue that the proverbial train has already split. The 32-bit versions of Windows has largely been relegated to low-end tablets and embedded (POS) systems. It looks like Windows 10 is finally starting to overtake Windows 7, and trends would indicate businesses are beginning the process of transitioning from Windows 7 to Windows 10.

                          The vast majority of consumer installs of Windows today are 64-bit, and as the enterprise moves to Windows 10 they'll be using the 64-bit version as well. With the Windows Server platform, that switch to 64-bit has already happened. The WoW64 subsystem (which allows 32-bit code to run on 64-bit Windows) was made an optional feature as of Windows Server 2008 R2, I believe. One practical reason for disabling WoW64 on the server is that it significantly reduces the attack surface exposed to viruses and other malware, most of which continue to be 32-bit.

                          Anyway, I don't think you're going to see Microsoft completely throw WoW64 out the window (no pun intended). But I can see a point in the not-too-distant future that they'll take the same steps with the consumer desktop as they have their server platforms, making it an optional feature and eventually having it disabled by default.
                          Mike Stefanik
                          sockettools.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mike Stefanik View Post
                            I'd argue that the proverbial train has already split. The 32-bit versions of Windows has largely been relegated to low-end tablets and embedded (POS) systems.
                            With the memory compression that Windows 10 introduced (something OSX has had for years), the 32-bit versions are extremely capable on budget systems. My daily driver since moving two years ago has been a $70 RCA 2-in-1, 2GB RAM and a nice quadcore Atom. I never use it as a tablet, but it is an awesome little notebook.


                            Originally posted by Mike Stefanik View Post
                            With the Windows Server platform, that switch to 64-bit has already happened. The WoW64 subsystem (which allows 32-bit code to run on 64-bit Windows) was made an optional feature as of Windows Server 2008 R2, I believe.
                            You are indeed correct and this was a major issue years back with some of the defense contractors I did work for. It was why I had to drop PowerBASIC for much of my work.


                            Originally posted by Mike Stefanik View Post
                            But I can see a point in the not-too-distant future that they'll take the same steps with the consumer desktop as they have their server platforms, making it an optional feature and eventually having it disabled by default.
                            Most software I rely on nowadays is available in 64-bit and the 32-bit versions are no longer updated and some haven't been for a couple of years. If 32-bit support dropped from Windows, it would not affect many people. In the corporate world, most companies are using 64-bit versions of Windows 7 or Windows 10. Other than supporting niche markets that rely on legacy versions of Windows, there is not much need for 32-bit software anymore.
                            I am legally blind. Please forgive any typos. I do try and catch as many as I can.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Yet Microsoft Office (the most widely used business app ever?) still installs the 32-bit version by default, even on 64-bit Windows, and Microsoft(!) recommends installing 32 unless you specifically need the large-file capacity of the 64-bit version. Over a million rows per Excel spreadsheet, stuff like that.

                              The markets move much more slowly than the MS hype. From less than a year ago...

                              Here are the top five most popular operating systems, according to Net Applications:
                              • Windows 7: 48.5%
                              • Windows 10: 26.28%
                              • Windows XP: 7.04%
                              • Windows 8.1: 6.96%
                              • Mac OS X 10.12: 3.21%
                              "Not my circus, not my monkeys."

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                The actual market share for the various versions of Windows can be kind of tough to gauge. AFAIK, Microsoft doesn't release any hard numbers, so the numbers are largely inferred using different means (user-agent values, etc.). The adoption of Windows 10 in the consumer market is much higher than it is in the enterprise, and those are virtually all 64-bit systems. For example, if you go by Valve's stats for their Steam platform, Windows 10 (64-bit) became the dominant platform less than a year after Windows 10 was released. So, to some extent, it all depends who your target audience is.

                                In terms of Office, the primary reason that they recommend the 32-bit version is because there's still a lot of legacy add-ins out there that are COM objects. If they haven't been updated by the developers who created them, a business is stuck unless they can find a 64-bit replacement. Not worth the hassle, so they keep on using the 32-bit version. It's also true that the 32-bit version is the "greatest common denominator" across platforms, which means it's the safe option for "I have no idea what a 64-bit Windows is" crowd.
                                Mike Stefanik
                                sockettools.com

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  My headline was rather meant to start a discussion. The real article is less sharp :-). They just want to make another sort of "Stupid User OS".
                                  --Theo Gottwald
                                  ------------------------------------------------
                                  76706 Dettenheim * Germany * info@it-berater.org
                                  ------------------------------------------------
                                  Joses Forum * Theo's Link Site * IT-Berater.org

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    The factor against forced change as Microsoft have tried to do many times is the user can simply keep using their old box longer if it does the job. This is why there are still many people using XP as it does the job. Offer and existing user the option of upgrading to 64 bit where they have to buy a fortune's worth of software that may not do what they want and their response is simple, they won't buy it. Word for Windows 2.0 did the job fine in Windows 3.11 and for so many people they don't want a new set of gizmos that they have to learn from scratch, they just want a computer that does the job.

                                    With the last forced upgrade to Win10 64 bit, apart from making a mess of most of my settings which I had to waste a day fixing, provided a pile of trash that I did not want or need so I had to turn it all off as well. Just as an example I still use a 2001 graphics app that worked perfectly up to Win XP but was problematic on Win7 and even harder to use on Win10. This does not win customers who migrate to gadgets if they can or alternatively stick to an old box if they still need a PC.
                                    hutch at movsd dot com
                                    The MASM Forum

                                    www.masm32.com

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      With the last forced upgrade to Win10 64 bit
                                      What OS were you forced from? ie forced from 32bit or forced to win 10

                                      waste a day fixing
                                      Only a day, I tried and gave up long after that.

                                      I've been beaten up (only a little bit) on a few boards for asking the question "x64, why bother?", I just don't see any advantage. I've a refurbed business laptop that flys on win7 x86 (even with the eye candy turned on) and only 4Gb of which a chunk is taken by the dedicated graphics.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        The 32/64 debate reminds me of the Linux debate here years ago. There were wild claims that PB was dead because they didn't support Linux, and Windows would be dead any day now! That's gotta be 8 to 10 years ago, and here we sit, still coding Win/32 apps (some of which DO run under Wine)!! Amazingly, I heard those same doom-n-gloom arguments in 1985 about the original Unix. So far, the only lucid 'technical' argument I've heard was from Patrice, and that was due to the nature of his specific need and environment.

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