Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Microsoft Brings DirectX 12 to Windows 7

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Microsoft Brings DirectX 12 to Windows 7

    https://news.softpedia.com/news/micr...7-525284.shtml


    Microsoft always leaves me chuckling and shaking my head. I am VERY happy about the news in this article (although it fails to mention it is completely worthless unless the graphics card manufacturers update their Windows 7 drivers to support DX12 (and we are at a point where some manufacturers have stopped supporting Windows 7 with driver updates)). This will force GPU manufacturers to release updated Windows 7 drivers.

    What leaves me chuckling is MS is wanting people to leave Windows 7 for 10, but yet they are now giving the holdouts a HUGE reason to stay with Windows 7. People have been saying Windows 7 is the new XP, but this move by MS has ensured that will be the case, if it is not already so.
    I am legally blind. Please forgive any typos. I do try and catch as many as I can.

  • #2
    Brice,
    Something inherently wrong with Windows 10? Yeah, I know massive updates 1-2 times a year. When you have a data cap of 20 gig/month it can be a real headache trying to provide that to 3 Windows machines and Apple devices. Oh sure I could pull down the latest update and install it to the other machines but I'm still hoping MS will get their act together as far as sharing those updates between the local machines; after all, the updates are pulled down in chunks. It should be a simple process to share those chunks.

    You shouldn't have to do anything special like have a WSUS running or getting Administrative Templates for delivery optimizations.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Jim Fritts View Post
      Brice, Something inherently wrong with Windows 10?

      Jim Fritts I am the wrong person to ask. I have no problems with Windows 10 and in fact have been quite impressed with its performance on a $75 tablet/laptop hybrid that I have been using since moving in late 2015. All of my stuff is still in storage. so to get by, I bought a budget system that was on clearance at Walmart. I was so impressed, I went and bought another one while they still had them. That was my first exposure to Windows 10, and literally within 10 minutes of turning the system on, I disabled all of the superfluous nonsense, including updates, and i have been chugging along with zero issues and this system is a workhorse for me.

      I am an honest Windows user and can, and will, point out the faults, but I always tweak my version of windows in ways the average user never will, and I rarely ever have an issue with Windows. The only versions I skipped were ME and 8.

      My systems in storage are either Windows 7 or XP or Linux Mint. I have missed the free Windows 10 upgrade period, so will likely keep those as is, or slowly move to Linux Mint for systems I can, but any new systems will come with 10 and 10 does what I need.

      The only negative I can say is at first I thought 10 was rather ugly, but I have kinda gotten used to it.
      I am legally blind. Please forgive any typos. I do try and catch as many as I can.

      Comment


      • #4
        It's "only" Direct3D (aka "D3D12" =the graphics part), not the whole DirectX12 library, which also consist of DirectInput, DirectSound.

        It's a quite strange move from MS, considering Win7 will officially stop receiving updates January 2020.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jim Fritts View Post
          Brice,
          Something inherently wrong with Windows 10? Yeah, I know massive updates 1-2 times a year. When you have a data cap of 20 gig/month it can be a real headache trying to provide that to 3 Windows machines and Apple devices. Oh sure I could pull down the latest update and install it to the other machines but I'm still hoping MS will get their act together as far as sharing those updates between the local machines; after all, the updates are pulled down in chunks. It should be a simple process to share those chunks.

          You shouldn't have to do anything special like have a WSUS running or getting Administrative Templates for delivery optimizations.
          You are aware that a Windows 10 system shares its updates with its "peers" (on the same LAN) , right?

          https://support.microsoft.com/en-au/...timization-faq

          Comment


          • #6
            Knuth,
            Yes, I know what they "say" is supposed to happen but it never does. It appears to me that they only share when all the machines are trying to download the same update at the same time; otherwise, zilch sharing. I leave my machines on 24/7. One gets the update. 3 Gig down. The next machine gets the update. Another 3 Gig down and so on down the line. That is purely insane.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Knuth Konrad View Post
              It's "only" Direct3D (aka "D3D12" =the graphics part).

              That is all that is needed, support for DX12 rendering. The rest should work with what is already there.



              Originally posted by Knuth Konrad View Post
              It's a quite strange move from MS, considering Win7 will officially stop receiving updates January 2020.
              I agree, hence my reason for the post. Although I applaud the effort, it leaves me wondering why now, when the end for 7 is supposedly so close.

              I am legally blind. Please forgive any typos. I do try and catch as many as I can.

              Comment


              • #8
                Microsoft heard feedback from Blizzard that features like multi-threading in DirectX 12 were bringing substantial framerate improvements to World of Warcraft on Windows 10. Blizzard wanted these same features on Windows 7, presumably because it still has a large base of players on this older OS.
                See: https://www.theverge.com/2019/3/13/1...rcraft-support
                Forum: http://www.jose.it-berater.org/smfforum/index.php

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by José Roca View Post
                  . Blizzard wanted these same features on Windows 7, presumably because it still has a large base of players on this older OS.
                  Latest stats for gamers shows Windows 7 64bit as having a 26.96% share and Windows 7 32bit as having a 1.43% share. 28.39% of a market is not something to miss out on, if it can be helped.

                  I have been very impressed with Microsoft since the ouster of Ballmer.
                  I am legally blind. Please forgive any typos. I do try and catch as many as I can.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here's Steam hardware review (automatically done by Steam's client, if you agree to). It's always a good source as what to expect from the consumer market (GPU excluded): https://store.steampowered.com/hwsur...lcome-to-Steam (that's where Brice's numbers are taken from)

                    In opposite to corporate hardware, you can expect those Win7 installs to silently fade away, as the owners replace their systems with new ones. Consumers often (rightfully, IMHO) don't see the necessity of upgrading their OS on their current (older) hardware, as they plan to replace the whole system within 1-2 years down the line anyway. And get a current OS version with it.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X