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Microsoft will no longer ship 32-bit versions

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Brice Manuel View Post
    Knuth Konrad Server versions of Windows have not shipped with 32-bit support for some time. WoW64 has to be downloaded. The defense contractor I did work for would not allow anything to be downloaded and installed on their servers, which meant no 32-bit support.
    It hasn't to be downloaded, it has to be selected upon install (or activated later unter Windows Features). Remember: Windows versions > 7 / Server 2008 had all necessary files installed regardless of the version one has licensed. That's why no download or installation medium is required, when e.g. upgrading from Home to Prof. version. Simply enter the new activation key, Windows reconfigures itself, restarts and voilá - new edition is active and working.

    The business market is just now starting to complain about needing gaming rigs to properly run the latest version of Windows. This is actually something that has been needed since Windows 7 (and I was griping about it over 10 years ago), but market adoption of new OSes and hardware is extremely slow.
    Not the business market I'm aware of, with running typical office applications.

    We're actually running with (comparably) lesser capable hardware now with Windows 10 than we did with Windows 7. Currently using the Dell Optilex 3060 Micro. A large role in the "slimming down" plays the fact that virtualization has shifted the computing power requirements back from the desktop/client to the servers. And that's not just us. Let alone requiring "gaming rigs". Also: Windows 10 is actually more resource-efficient than Windows 10, especially oon older hardware.

    See e.g.
    https://www.reddit.com/r/Windows10/c..._windows_7_on/
    https://forums.tomshardware.com/thre...nd-pc.3085241/

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    • #22
      i have nothing to back this up but i have felt that Microsoft grew the enterprise market by way of consumers purchasing desktop machines and it looks like they lost that edge.
      p purvis

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Knuth Konrad View Post
        Not the business market I'm aware of, with running typical office applications.
        Windows 7 requires a DX9 compliant card/chip to properly handle the use of shaders by the GUI. Windows 7 was mostly hardware-accelerated. Windows 10 is fully hardware accelerated and although it lacks Aero, shaders are used for every aspect of the GUI.

        I am legally blind. Please forgive any typos. I do try and catch as many as I can.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by Brice Manuel View Post

          Windows 7 requires a DX9 compliant card/chip to properly handle the use of shaders by the GUI. Windows 7 was mostly hardware-accelerated. Windows 10 is fully hardware accelerated and although it lacks Aero, shaders are used for every aspect of the GUI.
          You obviously know about this stuff but I thought that DX9 was released some time after Win 7.

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          • #25
            According WIkipedia...

            "DirectX 9 was released in 2002 for Windows 98 and XP, and currently is supported by all subsequent versions. Microsoft continues to make changes in DirectX 9.0c, causing support to be dropped for some of the aforementioned operating systems. As of January 2007, Windows 2000 or XP is required. This also introduced Shader Model 2.0 containing Pixel Shader 2.0 and Vertex Shader 2.0. Windows XP SP2 and newer include DirectX 9.0c[16], but may require a newer DirectX runtime redistributable installation for DirectX 9.0c applications compiled with the February 2005 DirectX 9.0 SDK or newer."

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DirectX
            Forum: http://www.jose.it-berater.org/smfforum/index.php

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            • #26
              misread and we are not allowed to delete a post made in error.
              I am legally blind. Please forgive any typos. I do try and catch as many as I can.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by James McNab View Post

                You obviously know about this stuff but I thought that DX9 was released some time after Win 7.
                There were maintenance versions released after 7. (7 would use software emulation to support what was not supported by the GPU for the GUI.)

                Most running 7 actually had DX10 and DX9 installed side-by-side, since 10 was not fully backwards compatible like previous versions of DX.
                I am legally blind. Please forgive any typos. I do try and catch as many as I can.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by Brice Manuel View Post

                  Windows 7 requires a DX9 compliant card/chip to properly handle the use of shaders by the GUI. Windows 7 was mostly hardware-accelerated. Windows 10 is fully hardware accelerated and although it lacks Aero, shaders are used for every aspect of the GUI.
                  I'm not sure what your point is there. DX orginally being released as a library to support better graphics for gaming, but meanwhile evolved into a kinda general purpose multimedia library? Dedicated gaming GPUs at that time being the only GPU supporting shaders, which meanwhile are implemented in basically every onboard GPU?

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                  • #29
                    If someone would please -- and very briefly, right down to the point -- clarify, as follows ,,,,

                    1: Will 32-Bit software still run on 64-Bit Windows for the foreseeable future?

                    2: Will the use of a virtual machine (preferably not one by Microsoft) which hosts any 32-bit OS be affected by Microsoft's decision?

                    Thanx-A-Lot. Stay Safe and Well.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by Frank Ferrell View Post
                      1: Will 32-Bit software still run on 64-Bit Windows for the foreseeable future?
                      Yes
                      2: Will the use of a virtual machine (preferably not one by Microsoft) which hosts any 32-bit OS be affected by Microsoft's decision?
                      No

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                      • #31
                        1. absolutely yes
                        2. NO
                        <b>George W. Bleck</b>
                        <img src='http://www.blecktech.com/myemail.gif'>

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                        • #32
                          George,
                          Ssssshhhhh! Anne will hear you

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                          • #33
                            So I am wondering how will merging WIN32 API with UWP help us? Any ideas?

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                            • #34
                              So I am wondering how will merging WIN32 API with UWP help us? Any ideas?
                              That was a different thread, and the story was that UWP not merging.
                              Dale

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                              • #35
                                To all who responded to my previous query, thank you -- Stay Safe and Well.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by Frank Ferrell View Post
                                  1: Will 32-Bit software still run on 64-Bit Windows for the foreseeable future?
                                  I am 51, and I have no doubt that 32-bit Windows apps will continue to be supported for my lifetime. Even if via emulation, like it is currently handled on 64-bit versions of Windows.

                                  You also have Windows alternatives like ReactOS which support Win32 fairly well. Not to mention Wine allowing Win32 to run on Linux and other platforms.

                                  IMHO, even though 32-bit Windows is a legacy platform, even if MS were to drop total support, there would be third-party solutions to keep your software working. It may be a legacy platform, but it is too important of a legacy platform to be ignored and not supported.
                                  I am legally blind. Please forgive any typos. I do try and catch as many as I can.

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                                  • #37
                                    Microsoft Will Merge UWP and Win32 Apps With Project Reunion

                                    The effort will streamline how developers modernize existing apps and create new ones by reducing fragmentation between the Windows API and Universal Windows Platform. It will provide a common, backward-compatible platform for existing code and for the latest client platform innovations.
                                    For the past couple of years, we have been breaking down the barrier between Win32 (also called the Windows API) and Universal Windows Platform (UWP) APIs. Project Reunion expands this effort to make it easier to build a great Windows app. It will unify access to existing Win32 and UWP APIs and make them available decoupled from the OS, via tools like NuGet. This will provide a common platform for new apps. Plus, it will help you update and modernize your existing apps with the latest functionality, whether they’re C++, .NET (including WPF, Windows Forms, and UWP) or React Native. As we decouple existing APIs and add new APIs, we are also doing the work to polyfill, as needed, so the APIs work down-level across supported versions of Windows.
                                    This seems the way it is going...
                                    and it’s decoupled from the OS, so you are no longer locked to a particular version of Windows.

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                                    • #38
                                      From that link...

                                      Windows 10 is fragmented between new Univeral Windows Platform (UWP) apps and classic desktop (Win32) apps.
                                      This is not true, as there is no legitimate fragmentation. The only developers dumb enough to turn out UWP apps has been Microsoft itself. Nobody else buys into their marketing nonsense.


                                      In spite of what Microsoft is now planning, normal developers will continue to turn out native 32-bit software and ignore Microsoft's latest whim, just like always. Microsoft will capitulate in a couple of years when they realize nobody has jumped on their latest bandwagon, just like always.

                                      Given Microsoft's propensity for coming out with new technology, only to abandon it in a couple of years, it is easy to understand why the majority of developers simply ignore Microsoft and keep churning out native 32-bit software -- it simply works as expected, which at the end of the day is what EUs want.
                                      .
                                      I am legally blind. Please forgive any typos. I do try and catch as many as I can.

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