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Increase the Precision of Your Floating Point Literals to 18 Decimal Digits

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Robert DeBolt View Post
    Walter,

    Where did you find "libgmp_3.dll" ? Google comes up with nothing. I downloaded some tar files from http://gmplib.org/#DOWNLOAD and found nothing.
    My apologies, Bob. The correct name is, "libgmp-3.dll". (When you make declarations in PB using this library, everything is underscores, not dashes (except for the libgmp-3.dll, of course). So, I inadvertently posted the wrong filename.) You will have no trouble googling for libgmp-3.dll. Be sure to download the indispensable manual, "gmp-man-4.2.2.pdf," which is available on the gmplib.org site.

    I, personally, downloaded the libgmp-3.dll from: ftp://deltatrinity.dyndns.org/gmp-4.2.1_DLL_SharedLibs/ At this site, you're able to click a link for your processor to get the appropriate libgmp-3.dll.

    Once again, I'm sorry for the error. I'm not normally that careless.

    --WH
    Last edited by Walter Henn; 29 Dec 2007, 05:47 PM.

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    • #22
      I've been writing some PB/CC programs using integer and floating point functions from the gmplib.

      If anyone has an interest in pursuing the writing of PB/CC programs utilizing the gmplib, please post a reply and I'll be happy to post my code. It may be helpful to those starting out, as the process is not always that clear. However, once understood, it is fairly straightforward.

      --WH

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      • #23
        Walter,

        Yes, I would be interested in seeing your code. I have been interested in Numerical Analysis for a long time.
        Regards,
        Bob

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        • #24
          Wolfram's Mathematica would, I believe, do the job of arbitrary precision math on almost any problem. As for speed, it computed & printed out my request for the first one million digits of Pi in about 2 or 3 seconds. You can call it from other programs and vice versa. The only problem is that it is pricy -- unless one qualifies for a hefty student discount.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Emil Menzel View Post
            Wolfram's Mathematica would, I believe, do the job of arbitrary precision math on almost any problem... The only problem is that it is pricy -- unless one qualifies for a hefty student discount.
            Just checked the site to see what you meant by "pricy." Perhaps you're right about the only problem being that it's pricy. But, what a problem!

            --WH

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