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Increase the Precision of Your Floating Point Literals to 18 Decimal Digits

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  • Walter Henn
    replied
    Originally posted by Emil Menzel View Post
    Wolfram's Mathematica would, I believe, do the job of arbitrary precision math on almost any problem... The only problem is that it is pricy -- unless one qualifies for a hefty student discount.
    Just checked the site to see what you meant by "pricy." Perhaps you're right about the only problem being that it's pricy. But, what a problem!

    --WH

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  • Emil Menzel
    replied
    Wolfram's Mathematica would, I believe, do the job of arbitrary precision math on almost any problem. As for speed, it computed & printed out my request for the first one million digits of Pi in about 2 or 3 seconds. You can call it from other programs and vice versa. The only problem is that it is pricy -- unless one qualifies for a hefty student discount.

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  • Robert DeBolt
    replied
    Walter,

    Yes, I would be interested in seeing your code. I have been interested in Numerical Analysis for a long time.

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  • Walter Henn
    replied
    I've been writing some PB/CC programs using integer and floating point functions from the gmplib.

    If anyone has an interest in pursuing the writing of PB/CC programs utilizing the gmplib, please post a reply and I'll be happy to post my code. It may be helpful to those starting out, as the process is not always that clear. However, once understood, it is fairly straightforward.

    --WH

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  • Walter Henn
    replied
    Originally posted by Robert DeBolt View Post
    Walter,

    Where did you find "libgmp_3.dll" ? Google comes up with nothing. I downloaded some tar files from http://gmplib.org/#DOWNLOAD and found nothing.
    My apologies, Bob. The correct name is, "libgmp-3.dll". (When you make declarations in PB using this library, everything is underscores, not dashes (except for the libgmp-3.dll, of course). So, I inadvertently posted the wrong filename.) You will have no trouble googling for libgmp-3.dll. Be sure to download the indispensable manual, "gmp-man-4.2.2.pdf," which is available on the gmplib.org site.

    I, personally, downloaded the libgmp-3.dll from: ftp://deltatrinity.dyndns.org/gmp-4.2.1_DLL_SharedLibs/ At this site, you're able to click a link for your processor to get the appropriate libgmp-3.dll.

    Once again, I'm sorry for the error. I'm not normally that careless.

    --WH
    Last edited by Walter Henn; 29 Dec 2007, 05:47 PM.

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  • Robert DeBolt
    replied
    Walter,

    Where did you find "libgmp_3.dll" ? Google comes up with nothing. I downloaded some tar files from http://gmplib.org/#DOWNLOAD and found nothing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Walter Henn
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Mattias View Post

    As fars as "like [gmplib]" .....I just looked at the gmplib home page at http://gmplib.org.

    Doesn't the download include executable Dynamic Link Library files for Windows? If not, maybe you can find someone who has compiled a DLL, or will compile it for you. As long as you can get the library as a DLL, you can use it with PB/CC.
    Originally posted by Walter Henn View Post

    While gmplib provides very high precision for functions included in the library, it does not contain transcendental functions (sin, cos, tan, asin, acos, atan, etc.) or log functions (log10, log2, ln, 10^x, 2^x, e^x, x^y, etc., where x and y are floating point numbers). This is unfortunate since scientists often need higher precision for these functions.

    If anyone is aware of high precision floating point software packages that contain these functions, please post here.
    Thanks for your reply, Michael. I have tried gmplib (with the libgmp-3.dll) and am quite pleased with its capabilities; it just doesn't have transcendental functions.

    --WH
    Last edited by Walter Henn; 29 Dec 2007, 05:31 PM. Reason: Correction of filename from "libgmp_3.dll" to "libgmp-3.dll".

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  • Michael Mattias
    replied
    >Frankly, I was hoping to find a library, like libgmp, that can be used within PB/CC.

    I did a quick "Google" for math libraries but got too many hits for the results to be useful.

    But I have to believe the 'code' sites like code project, sourceforge, etc simply must offer libraries for Windows developers. For that matter there have to be suggestions and recommendations right here from PB users for math libraries somewhere in these ten-plus years and 100,000+ postings.

    As fars as "like [gmplib]" .....I just looked at the gmplib home page at http://gmplib.org.

    Doesn't the download include executable Dynamic Link Library files for Windows? If not, maybe you can find someone who has compiled a DLL, or will compile it for you.

    As long as you can get the library as a DLL, you can use it with PB/CC.

    Leave a comment:


  • Walter Henn
    replied
    Thanks for your input, Paul.

    When I indicated floating point software packages, I did not mean a calculator program, such as Windows Calculator or Windows Power Toy Calculator. (I have the Power Toy Calculator on my computer and it's an extremely valuable resource that I use frequently. It has user-selectable 32, 64, 128 or 512 digits of precision.)

    With regard to UBasic, I'm still looking into it. One disappointment is that it's for a DOS environment, although it can be run in a DOS window.

    Frankly, I was hoping to find a library, like libgmp, that can be used within PB/CC.

    WH

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  • Greg Lyon
    replied
    The Microsoft Calculator Plus adds conversion functions to the Windows Calculator. It is also accurate to 32 digits.

    The PowerToy Calculator does not install under Windows Vista (but it can be run), Microsoft needs to update the PowerToys for Vista.


    Last edited by Greg Lyon; 27 Dec 2007, 12:16 AM. Reason: additional info

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  • Paul Dixon
    replied
    Walter,
    If anyone is aware of high precision floating point software packages that contain these functions, please post here
    Windows Calculator does them to 32 digits.
    Start/All Programs/Accesories/Calculator

    Windows Power Toy Calculator I think does them to 512 digits.
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/d...powertoys.mspx


    UBASIC does them to 2600 digits.
    http://archives.math.utk.edu/softwar...theory/ubasic/


    Paul.

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  • Walter Henn
    replied
    While gmplib provides very high precision for functions included in the library, it does not contain transcendental functions (sin, cos, tan, asin, acos, atan, etc.) or log functions (log10, log2, ln, 10^x, 2^x, e^x, x^y, etc., where x and y are floating point numbers). This is unfortunate since scientists often need higher precision for these functions.

    If anyone is aware of high precision floating point software packages that contain these functions, please post here.

    Thanks,
    WH

    Leave a comment:


  • Eros Olmi
    replied
    Also more info here:
    http://purebasic.fr/english/viewtopi...&highlight=gmp

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  • Eros Olmi
    replied
    Johan Klassen already did some work here: http://www.powerbasic.com/support/pb...936#post153936

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  • Eros Olmi
    replied
    I would be very interested to try and buy a dll allowing to work with big floating point numbers.

    http://gmplib.org/ is an alternative. I will work on it to create declaration file for thinBasic. If able I will post sources. They will be very PB compatible.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ion Saliu
    replied
    Excellent job, Bob!

    One might make two additions, somehow humoristic.

    1) Google has 2 O’s, while googol has 100.
    2) Googol is the great-grandson of the Russian writer Gogol; Google is the brainchild of a Russian immigrant to the U.S.

    Goooooogle ->

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  • Robert DeBolt
    replied
    Definition -

    A googol is 10 to the 100th power (which is 1 followed by 100 zeros). A googol is larger than the number of elementary particles in the universe, which amount to only 10 to the 80th power.
    The term was invented by Milton Sirotta, the 9-year nephew of mathematician Edward Kasner, who had asked his nephew what he thought such a large number should be called. Such a number, Milton apparently replied after a short thought, could only be called something as silly as a "googol."

    Later, another mathematician devised the term googolplex for 10 to the power of googol - that is, 1 followed by 10 to the power of 100 zeros. Frank Pilhofer has determined that, given Moore's Law (which is that computer processor power doubles about every 1 to 2 years), it would make no sense to try to print out a googolplex for another 524 years - since all earlier attempts to print a googolplex out would be overtaken by the faster processor.

    Larry Page and Sergey Brin, the founders of Google, named their search engine after the term googol. In 1997, Larry was brainstorming names with other Stanford graduate students, including Sean Anderson, and looking at available domain names. Anderson miskeyed googol as "google" and found it available. Larry liked it and the name "Google" stuck. Google's corporate headquarters is called the GooglePlex, an affectionately tongue-in-cheek reference to the origins of the company name.


    CONTRIBUTORS: Lawrence Lea
    LAST UPDATED: 07 Dec 2006

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  • Dave Stanton
    replied
    What is the difference between googol and Google?
    Not much, they are both very big.

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  • Ion Saliu
    replied
    About the rest of your post . I am not sure if there is a real question in there that I could answer...

    Kind regards
    __________________
    Eddy
    You talking to me? Did I talk to you? You like people ask you questions? What question would you like me to ask you? Okay, then. Question: What is the difference between googol and Google?

    Ion+

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  • Eddy Van Esch
    replied
    Originally posted by Ion Saliu View Post
    ...I came to know as Laitser Edmonds
    That would be Lance Edmonds. He was the former forum admin here.

    About the rest of your post . I am not sure if there is a real question in there that I could answer...

    Kind regards

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