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  • Chris Holbrook
    replied
    Paul, you are right.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Holbrook
    replied
    Paul, I thought it was zero, but your explanation is plausible, will have to recreate it to test.

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  • Paul Dixon
    replied
    Chris,
    if the QUAD has a value of zero, then you are right but doesnt this QUAD have a value of 5.62958543355904E+16 which is 00C800C800000000 in hex? The last 32 bits are zero.

    Paul.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Holbrook
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Dixon View Post
    It looks like a minor bug in the IDE.
    The decimal value of the number is being converted to HEX using only 32bits
    but the hex and decimal (mantissa/exponent) values are inconsistent with each other - if the QUAD has a value of zero, then it should be hex 0 and 0xE0.

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  • Paul Dixon
    replied
    It looks like a minor bug in the IDE.
    The decimal value of the number is being converted to HEX using only 32bits (the usual range for the HEX$ command) but a QUAD needs 64 bits to show it fully.

    Paul.

    Leave a comment:


  • George Bleck
    replied
    It is scientific notation for computing...

    1E+2 = 100 (read as 1 X 10^2)
    1E-2 = .01 (read as 1 X 10^-2)
    6.261E+4 = 62610
    3.74E-3 = .00374

    Another way of looking at it is if the number after "E" is positive move the decimal to the right that many places based on the number after the "E".

    Do the reverse if it is negative after the "E" move it to the left that many places.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Holbrook
    started a topic debugger quad evaluation

    debugger quad evaluation

    The debuggeriser tells me that a quad integer has a value 5.something 4E+16, (hexval 0). The attached picture saya it better.

    I don't understand!
    Attached Files
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