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  • Email Folder/Files

    I have many Exe files created by PB 3.5 in c:\junk folder
    with subfolders. How do I attach c:\junk, c:\junk\sub-folders
    and all the files(exe and txt) to an email?

    Now I'm attaching several at a time or copy to CD/flash drive
    and use snail mail. This is not to my liking.

    I know this doesn't really fit in a PB forum, but just maybe I'll
    get an answer before it gets rejected.

    Thanks for a hint as to what I should do.

    Jack



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  • #2
    Jack,

    If you try to send an executable file, 99.9% of all email servers will strip that attachment off immediately. If the server doesn't, any half-decent anti-virus program will

    What you need is to ZIP the contents into a single compressed file and then attach that zip file to your email.

    There are only about 2 billion free zip programs available, but I think you'll find one to your liking

    ------------------
    * Americans: Fight for Right. Join the push for the Fair Tax!
    Software makes Hardware Happen

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    • #3
      Thank You:

      I knew there was a nice/clean/simple solution and this is the
      place to find folks who know how to do just about everything.
      No, delete 'about'

      Thanks Again, Jack


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      Comment


      • #4
        Just an additional note ...

        Zip files are not safe to use either. Many email systems
        will block those as well.

        I often have to rename the files from ZIP to ZAP (or some
        other variation) and include a note in the email for the
        recipient to change it back to ZIP.

        Since this is so easy to get around, I have to question
        the worth of blocking ZIP files at all (but having to deal
        with it from my end sure is an annoyance).


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        Comment


        • #5
          Zip files are not safe to use either. Many email systems will block those as well.
          Hummm, I'm sure there are some really paranoid Admins out there, but I host about 2,500 email boxes with a hefty amount of traffic all day long. In 8 years, I can't remember a single customer complaining that they couldn't send a zip file through. (not that every customer would call me if this happened, but a good percentage of them would).

          My anti-virus products attempt to scan all file attachments so renaming a ZIP to something else has no baring whatsoever. Any standard compression method should be scan-able, so the A/V doesn't even bother to look at the extension. Besides, as you pointed out, extension based filtering is pretty lame. If the scanned file has executable headers though (non compressed) so that it can theoretically be run directly, it will be stripped off. File attachments that require human intervention to execute are safe as far as I care, I leave it to the end-user to decide if they're willing to execute it on their PC or not.

          ------------------
          * Americans: Fight for Right. Join the push for the Fair Tax!
          Software makes Hardware Happen

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          • #6
            Joe,

            There appear to be plenty of paranoid admins in the companies
            that I have to deal with, so I am at the point of renaming most
            of what I send out (when I can remember to do so) because I tire
            of having to continuously resend the emails.

            Perhaps it is just the industry that I work in but I have to
            deal with several cellular communications companies and I find
            that the ban on ZIP files is more common than you might think.

            Personally, I think it is a waste of time for their IS/IT
            departments since it is so easily circumvented (I guess they
            don't bother to scan the files, they just block the ZIP file
            extension).

            In any case, I just wanted to bring up the fact that ZIP files
            are not a universally safe file to send (I wish they were).


            ------------------

            Comment


            • #7
              I think blocking ZIP files is also a waste of time but Google must think it's a good idea because you can neither send or receive a ZIP file attachment in gmail unless you rename it.

              Regards,

              ~Bob
              ----------------------
              Composed with EZ-POST!

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              [This message has been edited by Bob Scott (edited April 15, 2007).]

              Comment


              • #8
                Gmail block .ZIP attachment only if they contains EXE (or similar, VBS, SCR, etc.) files.
                Don't seems a smart movie to me too, but that's what they choose to do.

                Off course, Gmail = some millions of mailboxes.

                Bye!

                ------------------
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                [This message has been edited by Marco Pontello (edited April 15, 2007).]
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                • #9
                  A bigger problem could be the resulting size of the ZIP files,
                  because he wanted to include all the files in a folder. Many
                  email providers block files that are too large or exceed the
                  storage allowance of your inbox on the server. Some will not
                  allow you to send a file that is too large.

                  Some programs that support ZIP files allow you to divide the
                  file into a number of segments that can be sent separately. This
                  was initially necessary for packing large archives onto a series
                  of floppy disks, but still proves useful when faced with a size
                  limitation with email accounts.

                  Using email to send files is not your only recourse, but it is
                  usually the easiest. Trying to use P2P or FTP, for instance,
                  would be more involved, and might cause a reduction in your
                  system defences.

                  ------------------
                  Old Navy Chief, Systems Engineer, Systems Analyst, now semi-retired

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Marco Pontello:
                    Gmail block .ZIP attachment only if they contains EXE (or similar, VBS, SCR, etc.) files.
                    That's right, and once again you can get around it by renaming the extension inside the zip. It's just a totally unnecessary annoyance. I send out a lot of files by email and more and more are failing to get through. It drives me nuts.

                    ------------------
                    - LJ
                    - LJ

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I send out a lot of files by email and more and more are failing to get through. It drives me nuts.
                      I used to do that and had the same problem; especially frustrating when a client has asked you to send an email attachment and then complains he never got it. (It is, of course, in his company's "spam, virus and other nasties trap").

                      Now I pretty much just put stuff on my web site and email a link. Unfortunately it turns out that I have to ZIP those files, too, since some email "protectors" don't allow emails containing text which lools like a <U>link</U> to an "exe" file.

                      MCM


                      Michael Mattias
                      Tal Systems Inc. (retired)
                      Racine WI USA
                      [email protected]
                      http://www.talsystems.com

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