Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

PowerBASIC for Windows CE?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Just some stuff I ran across in my reading:

    Intel Attacks Handheld Market
    http://www.forbes.com/tool/html/00/Aug/0825/mu6.htm

    "While the PC business has been very good to Intel (nasdaq: INTC), that market's growth rate is slowing. Handheld sales are likely to double in the coming year ... International Data Corp. predicts that handheld devices will outsell PCs sometime next year."


    Handhelds Sales To Swell To $73 Billion By 2005
    http://www.techweb.com/wire/story/TWB20000817S0010

    "Sales of small wireless Web devices such as handheld computers and basic mircrobrowser phones are expected to reach $73 billion by 2005 from $10 billion this year."

    ------------------


    [This message has been edited by Dean Sadata (edited August 29, 2000).]

    Leave a comment:


  • Lance Edmonds
    replied
    Originally posted by John McWilliams:
    If I could port my software to a
    "palm-top" I'd be a happy camper. If I could sell the software
    to the other 200,000 (Sky and Telescopes circulation figures)
    "hobby-types" I'd be rich. Let's see quality astro software for
    their palm top at 50 bucks a pop to 200,000 folks... Hon! where's
    my calculator?
    If you stand to make that much money, you'll be able to afford to employ a programmer to port the code to any language that will run on WINCE?

    Just kidding...!



    ------------------
    Lance
    PowerBASIC Support
    mailto:[email protected][email protected]</A>

    Leave a comment:


  • Philippe Monteil
    replied
    <<PowerBasic could fill the void. Either with a real compiler
    <<or a translator that would spit out C++ code an projects that
    <<the Embedded Tools can then compile.
    I think that a translator would be the only way to make the PB
    compilers multi-platform in a resonalble time. The idea would be
    to have a source code analyzer produce the syntax analyzis
    of a PB module in the form of an XML file then used to produce
    its Java, or C counterpart...

    Philippe Monteil
    JAZZAge Software




    ------------------

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Unfortunatly NSBASIC is not a compiler. It is an interperted language.
    NSA Basic uses the same VB Scrit engine as VB/CE when running on Win/CE.
    So Any issues you have with Win/CE you will have with NSBASIC

    Kevin

    ------------------
    mailto:[email protected][email protected]</A>


    [This message has been edited by KevinVoell (edited August 25, 2000).]

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I haven't used this tool, but it seems like it may be a possibility for BASIC programmers:
    http://www.nsbasic.com

    Regards,

    Jason Bock

    ------------------

    Leave a comment:


  • John McWilliams
    replied
    I'm a "hobby-type" astronomer. I do a lot of CCD imaging and
    have a scope that can be computer controlled for alignment. I
    have to drag a laptop out with me to do the things I want to
    do, it's a pain in the B***. If I could port my software to a
    "palm-top" I'd be a happy camper. If I could sell the software
    to the other 200,000 (Sky and Telescopes circulation figures)
    "hobby-types" I'd be rich. Let's see quality astro software for
    their palm top at 50 bucks a pop to 200,000 folks... Hon! where's
    my calculator?

    ------------------

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Ritter
    replied
    You could count me in for use of a PB-CE compiler
    (if there was one). Current exploration into CE
    for our company and development strategies around
    CE have waned because of insufficient development
    tools and the unproven state of CE thus far. With
    the latest releases of CE however, MS seems to have
    made their commitment to the embedded market. We
    currently use NT Embedded as the OS for a low
    powered imaging system and our interest in CE
    revolves around the creation of apps that can
    access and manipulate these systems remotely.
    Current research into compilers has turned up,
    the Embedded toolkit from MS, but also
    an alternative to that in NS Basic. I can't make
    any comments on either at this point for lack of
    testing, but taking PB's history and my appreciation
    of their compiler, I would use theirs over the others.

    My Vote for PBCE!

    Michael


    ------------------

    Leave a comment:


  • Charles Kincaid
    replied
    The situation would have been better if Microsoft had made a translator that converted Basic source into C++ source. At least then it would compile to real machine code.

    PowerBasic could fill the void. Either with a real compiler or a translator that would spit out C++ code an projects that the Embedded Tools can then compile.

    At work we are having to go out and hire C++ people for our CE shop. Not because of the operating system, but because VB for CE stinks! It works and I can code around most of the bugs and craziness, but it is slower than snails in a snowstorm.

    Since Microsoft has dropped the ball (again), PowerBasic could be in a great position to run ahead of Redmond (again).

    We can put all sorts of Wireless networking solutions in CE devices and use them to great advantage. SalesLink (tm) is just the tip of the iceburg coming out of the design team at DSI.


    ------------------
    ATB

    Charles Kincaid

    (The above is my opinion alone and not that of either my employer or clients.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    It's worth mentioning that the fundamentals of notebook computers
    are changing very fast (rapidly).

    Gateway is advertising a Celeron notebook at $999.

    The material which notebook screens are made from (constructed
    from) was projected to drop in cost. The Taiwan earthquake put
    that situation on hold but now that cost reduction fundamental
    will likely return.

    IBM, Sony, and Gateway are planning on using the Transmeta Crusoe
    chip in upcoming notebooks for longer battery life and for
    lower cost.

    The $500 notebook is within reach.

    ------------------

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    "Handheld devices, now well beyond fad status, accounted for retail sales of $460 million in 1999 and almost matched that amount in the first six months of this year. The pocket-size computers are growing more sophisticated by the day and are being touted for widespread use everywhere from classrooms to hospitals to Navy ships."-The Wall Street Journal, August 8, 2000.

    ------------------

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter Amick
    replied
    Originally posted by Andreas_Allerdahl:
    *nix isn't ****, windows ce is.

    I really don't care if CE is **** or not, I only care about what people are using...and I think that people are, and will be, using CE.

    ------------------
    Peter Amick
    Baybuild Solutions

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Andreas_Allerdahl:
    "the market is tiny"
    Well it's even smaller for Windows CE
    PLUS *nix isn't ****, windows ce is.
    From what many people are predicting, the CE market will be huge. Linux is pretty much in a class of its own, and while I believe it has great potential and will continue to have a healthy market share, there's too much hype surrounding it. Windows CE, on the other hand, is more or less an extension of what most people already have on their desktops and laptops, and for that reason alone, I believe it will be very successful.

    I don't think anyone would dispute that the Palm Pilot is a smashing success, and it seems that Microsoft has taken note of the reasons why Palm was a hit and applied these to CE 3.0. However, I've purposely not purchased a Palm for the last few years because none of the models offered the power and flexibility I wanted.

    I just got my wife an HP Jornada 548 PocketPC a few days ago and I have a Compaq iPaq H3650 on order. I can now carry around my email, documents, spreadsheets and databases, in addition to all the basic stuff like contacts, calendars, task lists, notes, etc. In terms of hardware, it's way ahead of Palm (even their high-end models) in every area: display, processor, memory, and expansion. And most important, it's easy to use. Microsoft finally seems to be getting it right, with a few improvements needed here and there. The PocketPC seems to have it's own distinct identity; it's not obscure like the ealier CE handhelds and palmtops that tried to squeeze a scaled-down version of Windows into a smaller (but not really small enough) package. It appears that WinCE 3.0 was designed specifically to support the types applications and functions that the PocketPC would be used for.

    Now, as far as development environments, it's got eMbedded Visual C++ (too complex and way too much debugging, etc. for even simple projects) and eMbedded Visual Basic (way too inflexible and greatly lacking in every area). We need ePB (eMbedded PowerBASIC).



    ------------------

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Peter Amick:
    As usual, I agree. I think PowerBasic is really missing the boat on this one, but I've said that before and obviously no one is listening. I couldn't care less about PowerBasic for *nix (the market is tiny), but CE will be big and PowerBasic would be a perfect fit. PowerBasic for CE would be well worth whatever resources would be required to develop it.
    "the market is tiny"
    Well it's even smaller for Windows CE
    PLUS *nix isn't ****, windows ce is.


    ------------------
    http://www.sublevel6.f2s.com/

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter Amick
    replied
    Wyman,

    Thanks for the tip. I'm familiar with some of the ruggedized CE machines, but I wasn't aware of any running 'standard' Windows. I'll have to look into it, though I don't know how prevalent they are in the construction field, which tends to be a bit lower-tech than the nuclear industry.

    Of course, at those prices, I could never afford a test machine!


    ------------------
    Peter Amick
    Baybuild Solutions

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Well, I like the HP-48 scientific calculator that can accept
    input of numerical data and then upload to a PC.

    But like a post above gave an example of, the Palms and Pockets
    are data flip-sheets or data collectors which interface with
    a parent application on a PC. I think that is the model to
    be aware of and that's based on experience in an industry that is
    remote-site-based or field-mobile.

    ------------------

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Peter,
    If you deal mostly with the construction industry and have several
    of these utilities that they use written in either DOS or Windows, you
    may want to take a look at http://www.daptech.com/wbp/produc00.htm
    to see some handhelds which use standard desktop OS's. These ****ers
    are TOUGH and waterproof. I personally saw one drop 30 feet pausing
    only to kiss a fluorescent light on the way down to a concrete floor.
    The only damage was the case seal was extruded in one place, but still
    completely functional. They're pretty proud of em' with a price of
    about/at least $3K a copy, though. We've been using them for four years
    in a nuke plant and they've taken everything we can dish out. One
    other thing I'd like to say (for outdoor use) is that when it's below
    freezing out, the LCD does not fade away like on those old watches.
    It's actually temperature compensated. Anyway, just something to
    think about in the mean time.

    ------------------
    [email protected]

    [This message has been edited by Wyman A Belts (edited August 17, 2000).]

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter Amick
    replied
    Originally posted by Lance Edmonds:


    how many of you guys are actually writing for the CE platform with another brand of compiler
    Lance,

    I have written a program for CE, a builders calculator which inputs and outputs in feet, inches, cubic yards, etc., for on-the-jobsite work. I have a prototype written in VBCE, but the memory usage and sluggish performance of VB would make me embarrassed to market the program as is. If there was a PowerBasic for CE, the calculator would be on the market today. Not a major program, to be sure, but it's one of several I would be working on if I could get my hands on a good Basic compiler for CE.

    ------------------
    Peter Amick
    Baybuild Solutions

    Leave a comment:


  • John Montenigro
    replied
    Lance,
    In response to your request for "how serious/how real":

    I write applications and utilities for a small family-run
    business. They run on our network of server, workstations, and
    dockable laptops. I'm adapting some programs for internet.

    The apps range from manufacturing, email, order processing, and
    other managerial and administrative tasks. Utiliies generally
    pertain to data translation and format conversions.

    One obstacle is the staff's reluctance to "lug" a laptop
    everywhere. (Obviously, none of them remembers the Compaq
    "portable" sewing-machine 8086...)

    I could probably get my users to take pocket-sized units with
    them and use them effectively, IF they saw immediate business
    benefit. Must be both: useful and unobtrusive. (BTW, some users
    have said that "too small" could also be a problem...)

    However, I would not be able to provide development on any
    platform that was significantly different from standard DOS and
    Windows. We just don't have the resources, nor do we wish to
    contract for something so specialized.

    *IF* I had access to the CE, AND it resembled what we already
    have expertise with, THEN we'd get into it (*provided that* the
    cost for the development environment was not unreasonable).

    Until then, we recognize that CE would be nice, but we're not
    planning on using it yet.

    Most assuredly, we would NOT be going outside our own needs
    into external markets.

    Hope this helps,
    -John


    ------------------

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hello,

    I completely agree with everyones wish for a CE compiler from PB. The embedded OS market is very hot right now and CE 3.0 is doing very well in that space. Win CE 3.0 is also hot in non Pocket PC areas such as factory automation, internet appliances, home automation, etc. I am currently working on a home automation system in my spare time and my dream platform would be a PC/104 mini MB with flash storage running Win 3.0 embedded along with Winlift. I could use this for both the touch screens and the home gateway. Currently systems like this can had from companies such as Panja and Crestron for mucho dollars. Even all the newest home automation control standards such as UPnp are TCP/IP based so this fits great with PB.

    Brent...

    ------------------

    Leave a comment:


  • Phil Tippit
    replied
    Lance,

    I currently have a package written using PBCC and PBDLL which
    creates, maintains and generates reports for a large client
    doing field disconnects for Time Warner Cable. I am also
    using a product called CASLSOFT which is an interpreter with
    a runtime that runs on most all Palm handhelds. Using Caslsoft
    CE, I created a program to maintain and change the database
    on the handheld's by the field technicans doing the actual
    work.

    Here is how it basically works:

    1. Client receives records to be disconnected on disk from Time
    Warner. The new data base file is created on the PC using
    the CableWork program(written PBCC and PBDLL)

    2. The data is processed on the PC and workorders are assigned
    out to individual field technicans. The Client will receive
    on the average 500 accounts and these are then divided out
    to 8 to 10 field techs.

    3. The CableWork program then creates CASL database files
    for each technican in the Palm User directories. These are then
    hotsync'd to the individual techs Palm's.

    4. As the field work is done, the techs change the status of
    the records on the Palm, reports either disconnects, payments
    collected, and converters collected.

    5. On return from the field, the Palms are hotsync'd back to the
    PC.

    6. The PC database is updated from the Palm/User returned
    hotsync files.

    7. Reports are created, including individual tech results,
    overall tech results, total disconnects, total money collected,
    total converters picked up, etc.

    8. A invoice is created and a outgoing file from the PC is
    created on disk for Time Warner to update their database.
    Most of this is all done in one day.

    We are only doing this currently in one city. But since
    Time Warner contracts out most of this work, there is a
    market out there of about 3000 contractors.

    If we have found this market, there has to be many more
    out there similiar.

    In conclusion, it would have been and would be great for
    future projects, if I could write the code and maintain
    the code for the Handhelds with PowerBasic.

    My .02 worth.

    Phil

    ------------------

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X