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  • Questions about PB/DLL...

    Years ago I purchased PB 3.2 for DOS and was quite impressed
    with it. Recently I purchased a "Learning Edition" of VB and
    felt ripped off when I found out it didn't support serial
    communications or other goodies I had hoped for. The kicker is
    you have to pay big dollars for the meat of VB, something I
    didn't know until it was too late.

    I have a couple of questions about PB/DLL:

    * Dynamic Dialog Tools - Just exactly what does it do? The
    description isn't too specific and there are no pictures to show
    what it actually is. I know it's not the drag and drop like VB
    but what specifically does it do? Create prefabbed code? Or is
    it just a fancy name for a set of capabilities PB has?

    * Do I have to buy Power Gen to get the advantages of drag/drop
    creation of menus, boxes, etc?

    Thanks,
    Steve

    ------------------
    ' Programmer's loop

    DO WHILE NOT comatose
    CALL WriteCode
    LOOP

    [This message has been edited by Stephen Perry (edited March 09, 2001).]

  • #2
    Hi Stephen,

    Someone will give a better description, I'm sure, but here's a quickie for you: Dynamic Dialog Tools is a code-based method to create windows that is far easier than using the API CreateWindow and/or DialogXXX statements. See an example here http://www.powerbasic.com/files/pub/...dt/address.zip . The DDT statements are those that start with DIALOG, MENU, CONTROL and/or contain CBXXXXX keywords, and the related CALLBACK functions referred to by the DIALOG, MENU, and CONTROL statements.

    PowerGen itself doesn't give you drag-and-drop creation methods, but if you have a resource editor that does, you can use it to create a resource file, and PowerGen will convert that resource file into API-based code for you. It's nothing at all like using a dragdrop IDE like VB, BCB, or Delphi. In my opinion, PowerGen is most useful if you're already experienced with writing Windows code using all API methods for building your app's interface. Otherwise, DDT is the way to go. There are several third-party tools, some free, that give you drag-and-drop designers for creating your program's interface. None of them are of the quality of VB or BCB, but some are quite good. You can check the Third Party Tools forum for a list (and now I'm sure Chris Boss will jump in with his sales pitch -grin-).

    Frankly, I was thrown off by code-based methods of creating GUIs at first, because I had only done Windows GUI apps with VB. Now, two years later, I can tell you that in my opinion, the code-based methods are liberating and actually *easier* in the long run (though there is a learning curve). I'm employed as a C++ programmer, and have used VB, BCB, MFC, and resource editors to create GUI windows apps, and I've got to tell you, DDT blows them all away. I don't work for PowerBasic, so I'm not trying to get you to buy the product, but I find I'm far more productive in straight PB with DDT than with any other tool set for creating GUI-based apps.

    So, I know you just asked what's DDT, but there's my response. I find DDT the easiest and most effective tool I've ever used for creating Windows GUI-based applications.


    ------------------
    Troy King
    [email protected]
    Troy King
    katravax at yahoo dot com

    Comment


    • #3
      Stephen,

      DDT is basically a set of PB functions/statements that allow you
      to create windows "forms" and controls with code. It is extremely
      easy to use, although there is a learning curve as with anything new.

      I have been using a mix of DDT and Windows API calls for my current
      (first!) project with PB/DLL and I wouldn't trade it for anything.

      BTW, I believe that VB "compiles" all forms created by the drag'n'drop
      into a resource file. I know a programmer who is writing an app
      with VB and his .EXE is now over 8 MB because he uses a lot of forms.
      His actual code is probably only 10% of the .EXE size!

      You won't have that overhead with DDT.

      ------------------
      Bernard Ertl

      [This message has been edited by Bern Ertl (edited March 09, 2001).]
      Bernard Ertl
      InterPlan Systems

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the replies guys. Both of you gave excellent
        responses and the information I needed.

        ------------------
        ' Programmer's loop

        DO WHILE NOT comatose
        CALL WriteCode
        LOOP

        Comment

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