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  • Stuart McLachlan
    replied
    originally posted by scott turchin:
    let me rephrase the question then?

    how do i determine the date from "seconds since 1970"

    scott

    i posted a couple of routines here a few days ago for dat/time arithmetic. see http://www.powerbasic.com/support/pb...ead.php?t=3874

    this includes a function dtgseconds which determines the number of seconds from "0/0/0000 00:00:00"

    just adding a "- 62167132800" should do the trick ( since dtgceconds returns that number for "1-1-1970 00:00:00"





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  • Errol Cheverie
    replied
    Scott
    Check the source form from some Unix date and time routines that I just posted,
    they maybe of some help.

    Regards;
    Errol

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  • Mike Burns
    replied
    Scott,

    I think you have to use Julian dates (one of the many) .. convert
    01.01.1970 to a Julian date .. integer divide the number of seconds
    by 24*60*60 to get the number days ... and add those to together and
    convert back. That should get you the date. If you MOD instead of divide
    you should be able to arrive at the time of day.

    Mike


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  • Scott Turchin
    replied



    OK Thanks!
    Let me rephrase the question then?

    How do I determine the date from "Seconds since 1970"

    Scott

    ------------------
    Scott

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  • Semen Matusovski
    replied
    Scott --
    You mix something

    A variant time is stored as an 8-byte real value (double), representing a date between January 1, 1753 and December 31, 2078, inclusive. The value 2.0 represents January 1, 1900; 3.0 represents January 2, 1900, and so on. Adding 1 to the value increments the date by a day. The fractional part of the value represents the time of day. Therefore, 2.5 represents noon on January 1, 1900; 3.25 represents 6:00 A.M. on January 2, 1900, and so on. Negative numbers represent the dates prior to December 30, 1899.
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  • Scott Turchin
    started a topic Easy time related question

    Easy time related question

    OK, still working on the Event Log.

    I have now acquired:

    lpBuffer.TimeGenerated

    This is in seconds since 1970...
    So I'm thinking along these lines but it is not working...

    I'd like to return it in a date format readable
    Code:
    Function ReturnDate(inTime As Dword) As String
    Local st            As SYSTEMTIME
    Local tDay              As Asciiz * 64
    Local tTime             As Asciiz * 64
    
    VariantTimeToSystemTime inTime,st
    ' -- Create a date string using the local settings
    GetDateFormat %LOCALE_USER_DEFAULT, %NULL, st, "MMM dd',' yyyy", tDay, 64
    ' -- Create a time string using the local settings
    GetTimeFormat %LOCALE_USER_DEFAULT, %TIME_NOSECONDS, st, "hh:mm tt", tTime, 64
    Function = tDay + " " + tTime
    End Function


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    Scott
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