Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

PB/CC or PB/Win

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • PB/CC or PB/Win

    Hi
    I have used Power Basic for DOS quite a lot until about 20 years ago and have also bought PB/Win. But as I more or less left the field of programming quite some time ago I didn't really use it. Now I am studying again and might need PowerBasic again. The program I might want to create will run in a shell, so PB/CC would be the way to go. Unfortunately I don't own it. Is there an easy option to use PB/Win for a text oriented software (more specific a shell-like program)? And if not, can I buy PB/CC anymore? powerbasic.com seems to be down, though I am quite sure I have visited it just some weeks ago.
    Greetings
    Bernhard

  • #2
    Hi Bernhard!

    I can view the PowerBASIC site and see that PBCC is available.

    Are you caught up in the problem that some overseas folks have with accessing the siite?

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you for your answer. If there exist some kind of restrictions for overseas users it could easily be possible that I am affected as I am from Austria. I will try to use my VPN tomorrow to access the site.
      By the way, do you have any information on how PowerBasic will develop in the future as it now has a new owner?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bernhard Sax View Post
        By the way, do you have any information on how PowerBasic will develop in the future as it now has a new owner?

        The new owner of PB, Adam J. Drake , posted a public "roadmap" here, where he outlines plans for the future of PB.
        I am legally blind. Please forgive any typos. I do try and catch as many as I can.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Brice Manuel View Post
          The new owner of PB, Adam J. Drake , posted a public "roadmap" here, where he outlines plans for the future of PB.
          The roadmap finally is outlined in this posting. Just to keep you from searching the whole thread...

          „Let the machine do the dirty work.“
          The Elements of Programming Style, Brian W. Kernighan, P. J. Plauger 1978

          Comment


          • #6
            The restriction is EU, not overseas in general. (curious thing that you couldn't get home page)

            I don't see shelling as needing PBCC, but as you wish.

            If the version of PBWin you have is version 10 it has TXT.WINDOW, very close to a console.

            With any version you could use SDK/API to open a Console. Of course things like WAITKEY$ would also have to be done via API procedures. ( I have no idea how because I have both PBDLL/PBWin and PBCC after PB DOS.)((and never needed an API console.))

            Cheers,
            Dale

            Comment


            • #7
              Try using a text window in PBWin.

              Code:
              'PBWin10 program
              FUNCTION PBMAIN () AS LONG
              
              LOCAL r, hWin AS LONG
              
              TXT.WINDOW "This is a text window",10,10,40,80 TO hWin
              
              FOR r = 1 TO 50
                  TXT.PRINT "number =";r,"Square =";r*r
              
              SLEEP 50
              
              NEXT
              
              
              TXT.PRINT "Press a key to exit."
              
              TXT.WAITKEY$
              
              END FUNCTION

              Comment


              • #8
                The OP aaksed about "run in a shell" and "more specific a shell-like program".

                I would presume that means he wants something along the lines of STDIN/STDOUT.

                This may be of value:

                https://forum.powerbasic.com/forum/u...-pb-10-program

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks a lot for all the input. I will take some time to get a bit into coding again (one really forgets quite a lot in 15 to 20 years) and decide what to do.
                  Regarding the connection problems, it really seems to be EU-related, connecting from Chile worked just fine.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Bernhard,

                    the "connection issue" is - as stated here - willfully enacted by Drake for EU customers (or to be more precise: IP addresses seemlingy stemming from an EU country) due to the EU's GDPR .

                    I seem to understand that Drake's core business has no customers in the EU, just when they acquired the PB compilers, they "inherited" us. As it takes quite some time and effort to ensure GDPR compliances, as a first band-aid they blocked access to PB's main site.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bernhard,

                      the "connection issue" is - as stated here - willfully enacted by Drake for EU customers (or to be more precise: IP addresses seemlingy stemming from an EU country) due to the EU's GDPR .

                      I seem to understand that Drake's core business has no customers in the EU, just when they acquired the PB compilers, they "inherited" us. As it takes quite some time and effort to ensure GDPR compliances, as a first band-aid they blocked access to PB's main site.
                      Thank you for the information, it reassures me that I live in one of the best regions in this world, being protected from all evil and - if the current plans regarding copyright laws pass - even from quite a lot of sources I use right now. Always makes me feel a bit puzzled when I hear our european politicians speaking about making Europe the leading economy of the digital age.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I know that's a tongue in cheek comment, *but* for me personally, something like the GDPR is a mandatory prerequisit in the digital age. Except if you want to willfully abandon the oversight of the people (aka, the government) over corporations and hand over the kees to the kingdom to a few selected corporations.

                        Basically GDPR has already been implemented way too late. And its merant as a means to tame the Googles and FBs of this world, not go after a tiny compiler vendor like Drake. And BTW, if you haven't had malicious intentions and already did the "right thing(tm)" as a business, i.e. you've already made sure your customer's data is kept secure and that any data not immediately necessary to perform the business transaction, hasn't been stored in the first place, then you're basically immediately GDPR compliant. If on the other hand it takes some kind of effort to conform to it, you alrady had a shady business plan to begin with. Knowingly or not. According to German laws, ignorance doesn't relieve you from your responsilities. I guess similar concepts exist in other countries, too.

                        The copyright ruling is a different matter. For one: I understand the intention and can even sympathise with it, the goal being to (fairly) compensate content creators for their efforts. But the truth here is that the creators do NOT benefit from it much. Instead the same old exploitive distributors reap the rewards. It also keeps an outdated concept of copyright alive, which is in its current form not fit for handling anything digital/virtual.

                        My 2 cents.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You are totally right that regulations for data stored and used by companies or institutions should exist. And the GDPR has for sure its merits in this. But what bothers me is that the EU often regulates things in a way that backfires on the people living here. Having well intended regulations for stored data or trying to create a fair deal for content creators (and I am one of these) is one thing but if it undermines the usability of the net as a whole because I can't reach sites or can't upload my content (I heard that the german branch of Youtube already thinks about more or less closing the site for EU users) something has gone completely wrong.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Well, from my perspective the "usability of the net" got ruined the day corporations decided to jump onto it. And by that I don't mean business deciding to sell their products also on a digital store and provide information abotu their services. But when e.g. distribution right holders put their content on the net - an invention that was created with the specific purpose of sharing - and then later on complain thatthe users indeed, how dare they! - do what the net is intended for: share content.

                            It's pretty easy: if you don't want your content to be shared, take it off the web. Case closed. There's no "right to profit" in any legislation that I'm aware of. Either your business model is capabale to craete profit in the environment it's launched or not. Free market theory suggests*) that this is what is supposed to happen: unprofitable business go out of business. What we see now happening instead: create a business, and if it's not profitabel, lobby lawmakers to enact laws so that it becomes profitable.

                            *) Yeah, I know, "free market" these days only applies to profit making. All other intentions and consequences that are vital and mandatory for a free market to function/regulate itself, are happily ignored.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              What we see now happening instead: create a business, and if it's not profitabel, lobby lawmakers to enact laws so that it becomes profitable.
                              This is exactly what happened in the EU. Springer Press and some other companies who have a hard time competeing used some legislators - more specific Axel Voss - to create the heavily discussed copyright reform that is underway right now.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                In the context of GDPR, the day the net got ruined was the day corporations started offering massive products for free. You could easily create and host FaceMash in 2003 for Harvard students out of your dorm room because you thought it was fun, or you wanted to create technology you might sell some day. You could probably hobble together the hardware to host all the Ivy league schools too. But once they started opening FB to all schools, or worse, the general public, for free, you knew 'ethics' would take a back seat to 'money'. You don't pay for data centers with ethics.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  You don't pay for data centers with ethics.
                                  Just reminds me on the criminal investigation into Facebook's behaviour.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Raymond Leech View Post
                                    In the context of GDPR, the day the net got ruined was the day corporations started offering massive products for free. You could easily create and host FaceMash in 2003 for Harvard students out of your dorm room because you thought it was fun, or you wanted to create technology you might sell some day. You could probably hobble together the hardware to host all the Ivy league schools too. But once they started opening FB to all schools, or worse, the general public, for free, you knew 'ethics' would take a back seat to 'money'. You don't pay for data centers with ethics.
                                    Corporations never offer massive products for free. They offer them in exchange for perpetual use of your personal data.
                                    GDPR is, inter alia, an interference in that implied contract. There are of course many other good aspects to GDPR apart from that interference.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Stuart McLachlan View Post
                                      They offer them in exchange for perpetual use of your personal data.
                                      Which you could argue they never fully disclosed. To the general public, it looked 'free'.

                                      Comment

                                      Working...
                                      X