Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Windows 10 V2004

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Windows 10 V2004

    Windows 10 V2004

    This version is being rolled out 'slowly' so it may be awhile before you are offered it. I couldn't wait and installed it. It is huge but all seemed well.

    I had some images to be edited and usually use my secondary monitor which is a backlit LED and much more vibrant than my primary monitor which is just a LED. The images had some terrible artefacts. I moved my image editor to the primary monitor and the artefacts were gone. My heart sank - I've only had the secondary monitor a short while. Went back to the secondary monitor, resized the window and moved it around. The artefacts moved as well so it was not monitor but the jpg rendering. I've only got one video card, so I am now scratching my head.

    Thinks - has V2004 screwed up my system? Nah! Well, one way to find out and that is to restore my system to a backup before the update.

    Guess what, no artefacts on my secondary monitor.

    Asked Google to check on V2004 and found this.

    Microsoft Confirms New Windows 10 Update Warning

    which mentions this:

    "These include problems with Bluetooth, audio, gaming, connectivity, graphics card drivers and system stability."

    SYSTEM STABILITY!

    and this

    "Among these, the most high profile are incompatibilities with certain Nvidia display drivers ..."

    I have just put a 28-day pause on Windows Update.






  • #2
    Originally posted by David Roberts View Post
    "These include problems with Bluetooth, audio, gaming, connectivity, graphics card drivers and system stability."

    You are just now learning to never install Windows updates because they almost always compromise system stability?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Brice
      You are just now learning to never install Windows updates
      I am sorry Brice but that beggars belief that anyone could write that.

      The sad thing is that not only were there some security patches in this update but also some new security features. Windows 10 was already the most secure version that Microsoft has ever published.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by David Roberts View Post
        I am sorry Brice but that beggars belief that anyone could write that.

        The sad thing is that not only were there some security patches in this update but also some new security features. Windows 10 was already the most secure version that Microsoft has ever published.
        There's a reason many of us are still using Window 7 on our primary development machines

        Comment


        • #5
          And then again there are many of us that are security conscious that are using Windows 10 and left Windows 7 years ago.
          <b>George W. Bleck</b>
          <img src='http://www.blecktech.com/myemail.gif'>

          Comment


          • #6
            Not installing Windows Updates reminds me of parents who refuse to allow their children to have 'jabs' for certain ailments. What they fail to grasp is that their children are at a greater risk by not taking the 'jabs'. It is simply a matter of choosing a path which has the least likelihood of doing harm.

            Installing Windows Updates is a risky business for all of us but not installing is riskier. Not installing Windows Updates is putting us all at risk and not just those that don't.

            With regard Windows 7 mainstream support ended on 13th January 2015 and extended support ended on 14th January this year. If anyone is still using Windows 7 on their primary development machines I sincerely hope that they do not go on the internet with them.

            I do a full system backup every day, so I wasn't worried about an update going 'pear shaped'. Of course, things don't appear to have gone wrong as quickly as this update did and backups before the update may disappear into the ether, so I put a copy of the last backup onto a volume different to my external backup drive before I did the update.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by George Bleck View Post
              And then again there are many of us that are security conscious that are using Windows 10 and left Windows 7 years ago.

              Windows 10 is an amazingly secure and stable OS, however you cannot compromise your system's integrity by allowing rogue updates to be forced on it just because Billy Goats says so. Security should always be your top concern, as should stability.

              Comment


              • #8
                Apart from the "Control" issue, Win7 64 works fine and if you depend on Microsoft for your security, you are in trouble. I develop on a Win10 64 bit OS version and it does the job OK apart from its many irritations but I keep a very good Win7 64 Ultimate OS on a spare box which is as up to date as it can be including all of the Visual Studio stuff I have on my Win10 box. The main reason why Microsoft desperately tried to kill Win7 is they don't fully control it like Win10.

                If you need to be free of Microsoft altogether, I have a Linux Mint 19.3 box that seems to work fine, its a little clunky here and there but if you are not developing Windows software, it seems to be able to do most things and there is a ton of software available for it. Video, audio, email, browsers and with the Samba server configured, I can dump junk on it from any Windows box. It also allows me to do something that is useful, I have 2 removable disk caddies (the passive ones that don't have any electronics in them) so I can copy data from one hard disk to another which is much faster than a 1 gigabit network.

                I refuse to pay for a Microsoft OS version just to do simple things.
                hutch at movsd dot com
                The MASM Forum

                www.masm32.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by David Roberts View Post
                  Installing Windows Updates is a risky business for all of us but not installing is riskier. Not installing Windows Updates is putting us all at risk and not just those that don't
                  If you actually believe that, you have no business being on a computer connected to the internet.

                  Installing a Windows update and then complaining it doesn't work? Seriously? Most learned this lesson in the MS DOS days with the Stacker fiasco.

                  You should keep your AV, Malware, Firewall, Browser and other security software up to date. Not installing a buggy Window update does NOT cause all of your security software to uninstall itself or otherwise quit working.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Steve Hutchesson View Post
                    Apart from the "Control" issue, Win7 64 works fine and if you depend on Microsoft for your security, you are in trouble.
                    Until I moved, I was still using a XP SP2 system for the Internet. Blazing fast! Once I can get a studio built, and I get my computers unboxed and sorted, I may end up with a 32-bit 7 system as my Internet machine.

                    Windows 10 is a nice OS when it is locked down and control is taken away from MS. That said, I still laugh at copying files from one drive to another. Makes me really miss XP SP2.

                    NT4 will always be my favorite version of Windows, but XP SP2 is an extremely close second. But, 10 vs. 7? Kinda neck and neck for me as I really hated Aero. 10 locked down is not annoying, and stays out of the way.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Windows 10 seems to turn off setting restore points.
                      I have manually re-enabled it.
                      Use WindowsKey/I or right-click desktop and select PERSONALIZE to access Windows Settings.
                      Type RESTORE in the search bar.
                      Select Set Restore Point from the selections that come up.
                      Make sure your main drive has protection ON.
                      It will probably be off by default.
                      This was likely done to save time when doing updates.
                      The world is strange and wonderful.*
                      I reserve the right to be horrifically wrong.
                      Please maintain a safe following distance.
                      *wonderful sold separately.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        David,
                        Likely just doing an update does not get the job done. Try system reset after the update. Usually works for me.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Brice
                          If you actually believe that, you have no business being on a computer connected to the internet.
                          That is so illogical and does not surprise me from someone who does not install Windows Updates.
                          Installing a Windows update and then complaining it doesn't work?
                          That is a false statement - I did not complain - I simply explained what action I took and ended the post with a smile.
                          Most learned this lesson in the MS DOS days with the Stacker fiasco.
                          I cannot see the relevance of quoting an event which occurred decades ago.

                          Originally posted by Kurt
                          I have manually re-enabled it.
                          Originally posted by Jim
                          Try system reset after the update.
                          The ultimate restore point/reset is to restore a full system backup. I ended up with a machine that had no idea that an update had taken place. My last full system backup, SSD to SSD, took 3m29s and had I not been told that it had started I would have not been aware of it.

                          When Microsoft have sorted out the problems I shall update again.


                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by David Roberts View Post
                            I cannot see the relevance of quoting an event which occurred decades ago.
                            That you don't, is indeed the problem. MS's updates are just as unreliable as ever, which is why so many wait for Service Packs (at least those tend to be more stable (but even then you need to wait a couple of months to install them).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              This is what I was referring to:
                              • Refresh your PC to reinstall Windows and keep your personal files and settings. Refresh also keeps the apps that came with your PC and the apps you installed from the Microsoft Store.
                              Settings
                              Update & Recovery
                              Recovery
                              Reset this PC
                              Get Started

                              I have to do that after every major update. It eliminates update dilemmas.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Brice
                                That you don't, is indeed the problem.
                                Quoting an event which occurred decades ago is not relevant if it is not linked to today by something like "and things have not changed". Now, whether anyone agrees with that is another matter but without the addendum there is no point in mentioning it.

                                Hi Jim. I have a certain amount of faith in Microsoft but it is limited and I would not trust a refresh or restore points. The problems that I have had with restore points is like a link in a chain breaking - the chain below the broken link goes down the drain.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Yes, "trust faith and hope" are hard to achieve nowadays. Thank you "Watson" and Twitter fact checking.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by David Roberts View Post
                                    Quoting an event which occurred decades ago is not relevant if it is not linked to today by something like "and things have not changed". Now, whether anyone agrees with that is another matter but without the addendum there is no point in mentioning it.
                                    You might want to ask the OP to remove his original post, as he claims he had problems with the current update.

                                    Based on the numerous tech sites giving warnings over the latest update, I feel safe in standing by my original comments.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      As all programmers can attest, you make code as well as you can and test, test, test. But you cannot test for infinite experiences and use cases. As such you need to at some point deploy as is, otherwise you would never deploy updates.

                                      Same mantra goes for Microsofts patches/updates. We are not guinea pigs, Microsoft has done some due diligence prior to deploy but when MILLIONS/BILLIONS(?) of computers have different end point configurations things are bound to creep up they could not account for.

                                      The notion that this is evil, bad, counter productive whatever you want to call it is your right, but you have to agree the reasons are for great purpose... FREE expected stability, FREE protection against known compromises, and FREE additional functionality, did I mention FREE. A true dev environment should indeed be isolated from unexpected change (or at least have rollback capability) but you also have to allow for the change at some point, otherwise you are not working on the what the rest of the world is working on and your code may break because you are not on the same platform your clients are. Additionally, the masses NEED these pushed because if they didn't update the world would be far worse off from malware.
                                      <b>George W. Bleck</b>
                                      <img src='http://www.blecktech.com/myemail.gif'>

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Talking about faith I heard a good one the other day.

                                        "I reckon that you are nearly as much an atheist as I am. I don't believe in 4000 gods and you don't believe in 3999".

                                        Originally posted by Brice
                                        he claims he had problems with the current update.
                                        Brice, a friend of mine dreads the half-yearly Windows Updates - it is rare for him not to have issues. On the other hand, for the most part, my half-yearly updates just come and go. About three years ago my Windows Update failed and I got into the habit of calling at Microsoft every Sunday to see if there were any updates. I think I went through two half-yearly updates and the Windows Updates started working again.

                                        I think that you and I will have to beg to differ. If you feel safe without updates, well, what can I say, I don't. The quicker Microsoft get things sorted the better - I should imagine the folk at Nvidia will be on overtime this weekend to get new drivers out. There are some excellent new security features in this last update and I want them on my machine as quick as possible.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X