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  • Knuth Konrad
    replied
    BTW, Omnibus is a valid, although somewhat outdated or old-fashioned, german word as well

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  • David Roberts
    replied
    The odd history of omnibus

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  • Egbert Zijlema
    replied
    omnibus as book

    I guess that in The Netherlands a bus (as a means of transport for a number of people) originally was called omnibus as well. But since I can remember we use bus (also but very rarely autobus is heard). Omnibus is only used for a book (volume) containing more than 1 book title, but as far as I know only the book sellers use it in their advertisements. Ordinary people simply call it a book ("boek" in Dutch), I think.

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  • Michael Mattias
    replied
    My bad.

    I have never seen 'omnibus' used as a noun before.

    My Oxford American dictionary goes even a step beyond that..
    om-ni-bus...n 1. A bus. 2 A volume containing a number of books or stories. .adj. serving several objects at once, comprising several items.
    You learn something every day.

    MCM

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  • Knuth Konrad
    replied
    Dave, I guess that's perhaps a AE vs. BE thing like elevator/lift or truck/lorry.

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  • Dave Biggs
    replied
    English: "bus" (noun) does not equal "ominbus" (adjective).
    ??
    Quick definitions (omnibus)
    noun: a vehicle carrying many passengers; used for public transport
    noun: an anthology of articles on a related subject or an anthology of the works of a single author
    Click to learn word origin

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  • Michael Mattias
    replied
    >and an omnibus

    English: "bus" (noun) does not equal "ominbus" (adjective).

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  • Rodney Hicks
    replied
    a sky (or clouds; I still am not sure how to call this background
    Coin a new word:
    skyscape
    (It's not in my dictionaries anyway.)
    Used as in landscape or seascape.
    Rod

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  • Egbert Zijlema
    replied
    Existing app.

    Nothing special, Michael.
    A long existing app. After so many years I just want the users give the opportunity to (dynamically) change the background, using bitmaps saved in the app.'s directory. To begin with, two bitmaps of mine will be included in the setup file: a sky (or clouds; I still am not sure how to call this background) and an omnibus.

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  • Michael Mattias
    replied
    > view, bus, clouds, sky,

    I'm still trying to imagine what kind of application uses these words in combination.

    Maybe a tourism promotion from the Local Chamber of Commerce from some place known for nice weather?

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  • Egbert Zijlema
    replied
    Not simply a matter of translation

    Originally posted by Fred Buffington
    I found a place on the internet that did it for me. I know a little spanish but not enough. I don't know if it has the languages you need and im sorry i dont remember the link but im sure you could search for it.
    No problem, Fred. One thing: it is not only a matter of simple translation. It's also how names of menus and options are set in localized versions of Windows. That might be wrong. For instance, in the Dutch version the "Help"-menu is wrong. Should be "Hulp". In English noun and verb use the same word, so Microsoft translated it "the English way".

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  • Egbert Zijlema
    replied
    Thanks, guys!

    To all you guys, who cooperated: thanks, thanks, thanks! I love this community.

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  • Arthur Gomide
    replied
    Portuguese (Brasilian)

    view - ver
    bus - ônibus
    clouds - nuvens
    sky - céu
    none - nenhum

    Edit - Editar

    Leave a comment:


  • Cliff Nichols
    replied
    Babelfish from AltaVista
    Does a pretty good job translating languages (although you may still have grammer problem between languages, but maybe not in this case)

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  • Eddy Larsson
    replied
    Swedish

    view = visa (as a menu entry )
    view = vy
    bus = buss (vehicle ?)
    bus(mischief?) = bus

    clouds = moln
    sky = himmel
    none = ingen
    edit = redigera

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  • Fred Buffington
    replied
    Egbert, I once translated one of my html files from english to spanish. I found a place on the internet that did it for me. I know a little spanish but not enough. I don't know if it has the languages you need and im sorry i dont remember the link but im sure you could search for it.

    Leave a comment:


  • José Roca
    replied
    Spanish

    View = Ver
    Bus = Autobús
    Clouds = Nubes
    Sky = Cielo
    None = Ninguno
    Edit = Editar


    Catalan

    View = Visionar
    Bus = Autobús
    Clouds = Núvols
    Sky = Cel
    None = Cap
    Edit = Editar

    Leave a comment:


  • Knuth Konrad
    replied
    German

    Menu "View":

    The well known main menu entry ist typically called &Ansicht

    - "view" (if thats a separate menu entry under "View") is either translated as "Ansicht" (as above) or "Aussicht", depending on the meaning. "A great view of the landscape" = "Eine gute Aussicht auf die Landschaft"

    - "bus" is simple: "Bus"

    - "clouds": "Wolken"

    - "sky": "Himmel"

    - "none": "Nichts"

    "Edit" as a menu entry is translated as "&Bearbeiten"

    Leave a comment:


  • Egbert Zijlema
    replied
    Thanks, Marco!
    Thanks Fred. Found most of it there. Only need Swedish and Catalan now.

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  • Fred Buffington
    replied
    Egbert, try this

    http://world.altavista.com/tr

    Translate words/phrases from/to many languages.
    Words generally better than phrases as to results.

    Leave a comment:

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