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  • DD comand (dump Memory to a file)

    Is there a way to do a DD command on memory so it dumps to a file?
    Inv. Mark Nelson

  • #2
    Originally posted by Mark A Nelson View Post
    Is there a way to do a DD command on memory so it dumps to a file?
    Dunno what a DD command is, but just create an absolute array AT the address required ( see help file for DIM, look at AT option) and write it to a BINARY file using PUT#.

    Or does DD imply some sort of formatting of the output? In which case it will run to more than two statements!

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    • #3
      DD comand (dump Memory to a file)

      DD is linux command, it is a RAW Data Dump.
      Inv. Mark Nelson

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Mark A Nelson View Post
        DD is linux command, it is a RAW Data Dump.
        like UNIX dd then, above method should work.

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        • #5
          Specifically, what memory are you trying to dump? In the old DOS days, you could access and dump anything, but with Windows, particularly with Windows NT/2K/XP and Vista. your application is limited in terms of what areas of memory it can access. Further, your application is unlikely to be allocated the same memory range each time it gets loaded. If you are thinking of data in your program space, then there should be no problem writing the data to a file, but a raw dump lacks appeal since it does not preserve structure or context.

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          • #6
            Donald, raw dumps are what you see if you review the 'GPF' report you get an opportunity to send to Microsoft. (Clearly done only when you have no paint flaking or grass growing to watch ).

            They can be useful when tracking data exceptions (eg, trying to add 62& and "dog"). except those don't happen with the PB compiler.

            Those data exceptions CAN happen when writing in COBOL, which uses some datatypes which can be made nvalid, eg BCD data containing digits other than '0' thru '9' in a nibble other than the sign nibble.

            Curiously enough, you know what causes that in COBOL? Careless use of POINTER variables or other direct memory access functions (Sounds familiar, huh?)

            MCM
            Michael Mattias
            Tal Systems Inc. (retired)
            Racine WI USA
            [email protected]
            http://www.talsystems.com

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Donald Darden View Post
              ...but a raw dump lacks appeal since it does not preserve structure or context.
              Clearly "dump-cracking" does not figure in your c.v...

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              • #8
                If you want a formatted dump whiich makes no assumptions about structure (like DD), you could use the code I just posted in the Source Code forum if you just want it on the display, or modify it to output to printer (and post the results!)

                A nifty programmer could also allow the data to be modified and rewritten, which could have its uses in testing and deugging.

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