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  • Mark Hunter
    replied
    Thanks, Mike. Turns out I do have an SSD. I notice I don't have the fastest machine only when I edit videos.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Doty
    replied
    https://cpu.userbenchmark.com/SpeedT...5300----260GHz 1025th of 1276 processors.

    The good news is faster computers for very little money will be easy to find and Windows 10 should run great.
    Hope you have an SSD and a gigabit internet card.
    Could also go used and get at last a quad core processor and a valid Windows 10 license.
    Your current machine is good for testing software since you know others have faster machines.


    I compared my old machine (with a I7-2600K) processor to the E5300.
    https://cpu.userbenchmark.com/Compar...E5300/621vsm38

    If you don't have an SSD this should more than double your performance for about $45.
    Plug into a second slot and use something like Macrium Reflect to clone over to it.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07864WMK8?tag=userbenchmark-20&linkCode=ogi&th=1&psc=1

    If your machine does everything you ever want ignore my babble.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stuart McLachlan
    replied
    If you got a spare $40 000 or so, I think the Overclockers 8Pack Orion X2 will meet your needs.

    https://www.overclockers.co.uk/lp/8pack-orionx2.html

    Click image for larger version

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    Leave a comment:


  • Kerry Farmer
    replied
    So if I have lots of money and want the fastest computer, what do I buy?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Hunter
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Doty View Post
    ...
    ... If you do a clean install of 64-bit Windows 7, why not go to Windows 10 64-bit?
    I used Windows 10 on an OPC (other person's computer) and after two weeks disliked it as much as when I started.
    Last edited by Mark Hunter; 30 Dec 2020, 04:25 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Doty
    replied
    Click on Last Updated column and it looks like updates are coming monthly.
    (KB4592510) 12/6/2020 appears to be the latest. Will this continue?
    If you do a clean install of 64-bit Windows 7, why not go to Windows 10 64-bit?

    http://www.catalog.update.microsoft....dows+7+updates

    Note:
    The current version of Windows 10 as of 12/29/2020 is Version 20H2 (OS Build 19042.685) according to WinVer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Johan Klassen
    replied
    I noticed that on my Windows 7 Ultimate VM I can still get defender updates but not on the pro version.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Hunter
    replied
    My PC uses a 64 bit CPU,
    Pentium Dual-Core E5300 (2 MB L2 cache)
    running at 2.6 GHz with 4 GB of RAM.

    I haven’t added any new hardware since I first got it 10 years ago.

    At that time I had the choice of installing 32 or 64 bit Windows 7 and chose 32. I have always kept this O/S current with the recommended updates, until Microsoft stopped supporting it.

    Suppose I do a “clean install’ of 64 bit Windows 7. Afterwards would Microsoft provide all the old Windows 7 updates so I can make the new O/S as current as it is now?

    For example, if right after installing I click “Windows Update” on the Control Panel, would it find all the updates the O/S needs and install them?

    This webpage indicates that the answer was yes in July 2019, but that was before January 2020 when Microsoft stopped supporting Windows 7.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Doty
    replied
    I support one 16-bit program and 32-bit programs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Hutchesson
    replied
    Mike,

    Why are you using a 32 OS version, it will be nothing but trouble with all sorts of drivers. I understand if you have very old hardware PIV or earlier but apart from that 64 bit is current and that is where the support is in terms of drivers and apps.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Doty
    replied
    Nvidia dropped 32-bit support.
    Nvidia GTX 1050 conflicted with Windows 10-32-bit especially when using Windows Update.
    https://nvidia.custhelp.com/app/answ...ail/a_id/4604/

    Created 2 VirtualBox machines on a Windows 10 64-bit machine.
    Windows 7 32-bit and Windows 10-32 bit.
    Be sure to also install the VirtualBox extension pack download for each.
    In settings, network might want settings, network, bridged adapter.
    In USB settings might want to add USB 3.0 and click add button to add USB devices.
    In settings, storage add an optical drive letter. Other options like number of CPU's can be later changed.

    www.virtualbox.org
    Virtualbox wants a 64-bit host in current versions.

    I did not install any Visual Basic 6.0 into the virtual boxes since it works better now in 64-bit than it ever did before.
    The moving of objects in forms now works great using compatibility for Windows XP (Service Pack 3)

    Placing data files inside the virtual box instead of mapping folders to the host is about 3-times faster.
    I backup certain folders to the host using map and share.
    Everything is backed up using Rapid Delta clone feature of paid version of Macirum Reflect.

    Cloned drives are also USB bootable since original source drive had the free Hasleo Windows To Go applied to it (takes about 5-seconds.)
    A cloned drive can then be plugged into other computers USB 3.0 and run as is without any windows installation.
    https://www.easyuefi.com/wintousb/index.html
    Note: Only need to use the tools option in the upper right corner and select USB drive and click ok to turn into a USB bootable drive.


    This was a plan for 32-bit support going away.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rod Macia
    replied
    Originally posted by Mark Hunter View Post
    My concern is the reverse. I want to keep Windows 7. (I can deal with the security issue.) However eventually I might like to upgrade my PC (Pentium Dual Core E5300) that was purchased ten years ago.

    The article I referenced seems to suggest that a new PC’s video card, sound card, etc might not work with Windows 7.
    And you are right to be concerned, Windows 7 has reached end of life, so hardware vendors have less insensitive to spend resources to maintain or create drivers that will work in old OS's
    The market share has also dropped significantly for win7 due to end of life.

    So if you plan to keep Windows 7, then you should make the move sooner than later, and do your homework to make sure you can still find drivers for new hardware you plan to purchase. Like Steve said you may still find other PC vendors drivers or direct from hardware maker, that will work with your New PC with Win7, Some times you can even use Win8 drivers, but lots of googling may be involved.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Hutchesson
    replied
    I don't know about working but I recently had a Win7 64 pro box running OK that was installed from scratch then put a recent video card in it and the vendor AMD Radeon via ASUS provided the drivers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Hunter
    replied
    Steve,

    My concern is the reverse. I want to keep Windows 7. (I can deal with the security issue.) However eventually I might like to upgrade my PC (Pentium Dual Core E5300) that was purchased ten years ago.

    The article I referenced seems to suggest that a new PC’s video card, sound card, etc might not work with Windows 7.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Hutchesson
    replied
    Mark,

    I have been running Win10 64 for about 5 years and I own a reasonable amount of old software. Some of it has had problems in the past but of late most of it runs well. With version 20H2 Windows 64 Pro I can run my ancient (2001) MicroGrafx Picture Publisher without any problems. I think Microsoft may have softened their disposition on trashing older software.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Hunter
    replied
    Dated January 15, 2016:
    Microsoft updates support policy: New CPUs will require Windows 10

    “In a change to its longstanding support policy, Microsoft says PCs based on new CPU architectures, including Intel's Skylake chips, will require Windows 10.”

    Note that the concern is not antique hardware running modern software but antique software running on modern hardware.

    "New consumer-based Skylake devices must run Windows 10 to be supported." This has nothing to do with running old software on the new machines, so my earlier post was mistaken.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Hutchesson
    replied
    If you are having driver problems with Intel hardware, go to the Intel site and look for drivers for that particular processor. I had to do it recently by using an Intel Xeon in a test Chinese motherboard where the Win 10 install did not provide the chipset driver. In that case I had to get the server drivers as a Xeon is basically a server processor but plonked them in and all of the "Base System Devices" suddenly disappeared in Device Manager. I am not up to date with AMD CPUs but I imagine it would be much the same.

    There is another trick if you are livening up an antique, if the main vendors don't have drivers for an antique, look around some of the other vendors and you might get lucky. I have a test XP box that you could not get drivers for with an old i5 so I looked around and found a Lenovo driver set that worked. I think Linux may support old hardware better if that's the direction you want to go in.

    If you are occasionally driven by boredom, here is my approach to a 12 core Xeon on a Chinese board with Win10 64 bit.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-b-2qAnx7dg

    Leave a comment:


  • Stuart McLachlan
    replied
    > "Microsoft won't update"

    It's not a case of Microsoft "not doing something". Microsoft don't write drivers for processors.
    What the processor manufacturers actually say is that they won't be writing drivers for old operating systems for new generations of processors. Which makes sense - there's nothing for them to gain by doing so.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Mattias
    replied
    What was announced is that Microsoft won't update older versions of Windows to take advantage of the new capabilities of newer processors.
    Well, that is different.

    But it shows you what a careless reading of or writing about the 'event' can lead to!

    At least this one didn't feature Satanist blood-drinking pedofiles flying silent black helicopters

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Dixon
    replied

    It's not that the processors will be designed not to work with older versions of Windows.
    Microsoft can't do that. Intel wouldn't do that.

    What was announced is that Microsoft won't update older versions of Windows to take advantage of the new capabilities of newer processors.

    Leave a comment:

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