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  • #21
    Steve,
    Our customers are happy because a few of them related back to us that they found out that some of their technicians attempted
    to steal the software ( as you see some of these technicians will try to moonlight for some small jobs at home). And that their
    managers found out about attempts to steal the software.

    It was fortunate that the software wasn't stolen as these technicians (who are unqualified Engineers) were NOT able to
    run the software which can result in buildings collapse. And because of our software these technicians are now caught
    and fired because they are moonlighting !!!

    So we have happy customers and our software have prevented unauthorized access or averted building collapse disasters.

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    • #22
      In regards to usage of dongles, there are some disadvantages :

      1. Dongles need to be shipped to other countries and these can be delayed ( for at least a week)
      arising from custom clearance.
      2. Their protective mechanism is not all perfect and can be broken by smart hackers
      3. A dongle failure will entail the customer unbearable delays as a new one need to be
      shipped over.
      4. If the dongle manufacturer is located in China, then we have to be careful to ensure
      that dongle is not tampered or embedded with spyware!!!

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      • #23
        Howdy, Steve and George!

        I like your comments about protecting the user's right to continue using a paid application. Neither user inactivity nor company existence nor internet access should interfere with using software bought under a paid license.

        But if a user purchases a subscription for an application and knows that the app will be disabled when attempted to start outside the subscription conditions (time, price guarantees, .etc) how is that anti-consumer? To resolve the worries that you mention, can't the user simply decide to purchase the life-time, non-subscription version of the software (assuming there is one, of course).?

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        • #24
          Originally posted by Gary Beene View Post
          But if a user purchases a subscription for an application and knows that the app will be disabled when attempted to start outside the subscription conditions (time, price guarantees, .etc) how is that anti-consumer? To resolve the worries that you mention, can't the user simply decide to purchase the life-time, non-subscription version of the software (assuming there is one, of course).?
          The issue is that a lot of software these days doesn't have a "life-time, non-subscription" version.

          There are a number of issues with annual licencing including
          • WIll the provider still be in existence when you want to renew - if not, you have to scramle to find a replacement.
          • WIll they still be licencing that version of solftware or will you have to upgrade it, even though the existing version meets your requirements.
          • WIll they remove any component that you currently use from the new version
          • Once you are locked in, you have no gurarantee of of what the fee is going to be for the next licence period.
          • If it's a rarely used application, it's hard to justify the typical monthly/annual licence cost in terms of cost per use.
          (FWIW, I refuse to use Office 365 with all of it's ongoing fees and internet dependency and advise my clients to do the same. I buy perpetual licences for the retail CD version)

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          • #25
            Not long ago I downloaded an STL editor from the Microsoft store and ran it. It forced you through an unwanted tutorial then let you loose on an undocumented capacity so after a quick play, I went back to doing my normal work. Next time I tried to use it, it started squarking for money and did not work any longer. It was listed in the Microsoft store as a free app that you could pay for if you wanted the PRO version. They wanted about $450 USD for it on an annual basis. It has been converted to free disk space. It apparently came from Poland.
            hutch at movsd dot com
            The MASM Forum - SLL Modules and PB Libraries

            http://www.masm32.com/board/index.php?board=69.0

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            • #26
              We discussed software protection a lot during my days in the ASP (Association of Shareware Professionals) back in the 90's and a conclusion was that there is such a thing as "protect yourself to death" - that is, the harder it becomes to download and/or run a program, the less number of users you get = the less number of licenses you'll sell in the end. I remember a discussion I had with Nico Mak (WinZip) at a meeing in Rhode Island -98 about this and he pointed at his own strategi - no limits, easy to download and run - only a few light reminders about purchase. He did "fairly" well with that over the years..

              When it comes to "specialized" software, I remember when AutoCad released a Dongle protected version many years ago. It didn't take long before a group of hackers (from Austria, if I remember correctly) managed to crack it. In short - if the need exist, there is always someone with ability to break it. If the need isn't there, then no need to worry - simple protection is enough. So the answer usually is - the more users you attract, the more licenses you will sell in the end. AutoCad is good example in that it was very expensive, but thanks to many cracked versions was spread, they got a big user base among poor students - who in turn learned and got used to it - and therefore desired/bought it once they got a professional job.

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              • #27
                I simply refuse to pay for subscription software,depending on what I am doing
                You have a cell phone? Your service is a software subscription.

                Just sayin'.
                Michael Mattias
                Tal Systems (retired)
                Port Washington WI USA
                [email protected]
                http://www.talsystems.com

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by Michael Mattias View Post

                  You have a cell phone? Your service is a software subscription.

                  Just sayin'.
                  A telephone service (fixed or cell) is no more a software subcription service than paying periodically for internet connectivity, domain hosting, water, electricity or piped gas (I don't mean petrol) to your home, paying rent on a house, buying a season ticket for a bus or train, subscribing to a magazine or newspaper, ....

                  In all such cases, you are paying for the use of a resource that someone is continuing to provide. Paying to use a piece of software which does not utilise someone else's infrastructure or resources is fundamentally different.

                  (That said I've just quoted a client for an annual licence for an application I have written )

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