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  • EMAIL and the emailfrom part

    A customer wants to notify all their customers with a message sent by email. They want someone to send it from their desktop using a PB program to get it into the draft folder of MS Outlook and they will send it from there (Exchange is involved)

    They don't want the From: to be the person's email account that is sending the emails but a generic customizable one.

    Any ideas or code samples.

    Bob Mechler

  • #2
    Hi Bob

    We use tools from Catalyst to do this in a secure manner via TLS. You will need to configure the Exchange connectors to allow sending as someone else. Of course you can do this via SMPT using the samples in PB too, if exchange allows but the message will not go to the draft folder as it is going into the delivery mechanisms of exchange. This is easily fixed by CC'ing yourself and then using rules to file it wherever.

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    • #3
      You can try using the emailitem.sendusingaccount property...
      SendUsingAccount Returns or sets an Account object that represents the account under which the MailItem is to be sent. Read/write.
      Source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/libr...ffice.12).aspx


      MCM
      Last edited by Michael Mattias; 1 Mar 2012, 03:37 PM.
      Michael Mattias
      Tal Systems Inc.
      Racine WI USA
      mmattias@talsystems.com
      http://www.talsystems.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Personally I would go back and redefine the requirement. It looks as though the client is telling you how they think something should be done rather than what needs to be done.

        Why do they want it to go into an Outlook draft folder and be sent from there? So that they have a record of it? i.e is the real requirement just to have a copy of the sent message in someone's Outlook? Or are they going to modify the draft before it is sent - in which case, can the original app do that?

        Are you a developer or just a programmer?
        --
        [URL="http://www.camcopng.com"]CAMCo - Applications Development & ICT Consultancy[/URL][URL="http://www.hostingpng.com"]
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        • #5

          Personally I would go back and redefine the requirement. It looks as though the client is telling you how they think something should be done rather than what needs to be done.
          ...
          Are you a developer or just a programmer <happy face>
          Not to get overly pedantic here, but......

          There is no such thing as "just" a programmer.

          Programmers are professionals, just as are developers. They deserve equal respect for what they do. You simply have to recognize that programmers and developers do different things.

          BTW, neither a developer OR a programmer should "go back and redefine the requirement." That's what consultants do.

          Sorry for the diversion, but acknowledging the differences between "programmers", "developers, "contractors" and "consultants" has has been one of my "hot button" issues since the 1970s.


          MCM
          Michael Mattias
          Tal Systems Inc.
          Racine WI USA
          mmattias@talsystems.com
          http://www.talsystems.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Michael Mattias View Post
            BTW, neither a developer OR a programmer should "go back and redefine the requirement." That's what consultants do.
            No, it's what Users do. They can hire consultants if they wish. Users own the requirement, and the consequences of its implementation.

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            • #7
              >BTW, neither a developer OR a programmer should "go back and redefine the requirement." That's what consultants do.

              Not in my world.

              >Sorry for the diversion, but acknowledging the differences between "programmers", "developers, "contractors" and "consultants" has has been one of my "hot button" issues since the 1970s.

              I too apologise if we are once again going too far off-thread. Maybe we should take this one to the Cafe.

              You and I obviously differ on what we think those terms mean. To me you are conflating two different concepts there:

              1. Developer/Analyst/Programmer
              a. A programmer is someone who is given a set of specifications and creates the code to make it happen.
              b. A systems analyst is someone who works with the client to develop the specifications that the programmer works to.
              c. A developer is both the systems analyst and the programmer.

              2. Consultant/contractor
              a. A consultant is someone who is hired to produce recommendations for an organisation, which that organisation may or may not adopt. If the recommendations are adopted, the consultant may then be contracted to implement the recommendations.

              b. A contractor is someone who is hired to produce a solution in part or in whole (i.e. he may be contracted as a developer, analyst or programmer).

              (Which is why my business card, letterhead etc say both "Information Systems Development" and "ICT Consultancy".)

              I just found this:
              http://cpbc.ucsf.edu/do_business_wit..._vs_consultant

              In a nutshell, Consultants provide advice, while Contractors "do" things.
              The differences between a Consultant and a Contractor can seem like you’re splitting hairs, but doing so is required under the law.
              ...
              A Contractor relationship exists when UCSF has the right to control only the end result of a service, not the way it is performed.
              ...
              In contrast to Contractors/“doers”, Consultants generally offer only advice or propose solutions to problems, but they do not direct, carry out, or implement solutions. UCSF cannot control either the result of the Consultant’s service or the way it is performed.
              --
              [URL="http://www.camcopng.com"]CAMCo - Applications Development & ICT Consultancy[/URL][URL="http://www.hostingpng.com"]
              PNG Domain Hosting[/URL]

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              • #8
                IME "contractor" just relates to how one is paid, typically without deduction of tax by the client, contrast with "employee" but duties could be the same as any other employee from cleaner to managing director.

                "Consultant" is another of those words which is becoming progressively devalued by innapropriate use. Thus we have "professional helpdesk consultants" and such nonsense. But essentially a consultant is consulted rather than directed. I don't think that this really happens any more.

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                • #9
                  But essentially a consultant is consulted rather than directed. I don't think that this really happens any more.
                  Which planet did you say you were from?
                  Michael Mattias
                  Tal Systems Inc.
                  Racine WI USA
                  mmattias@talsystems.com
                  http://www.talsystems.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The same one as I live on apparently - which one are you from? :-)
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                    [URL="http://www.camcopng.com"]CAMCo - Applications Development & ICT Consultancy[/URL][URL="http://www.hostingpng.com"]
                    PNG Domain Hosting[/URL]

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                    • #11
                      Asked how he would describe himself, a consultant once answered me: "a hired scapegoat".

                      Which is not too far from the truth, I guess. The one who hires the consultant(s) has always two options:

                      1) If the project fails: blame the terrible consultant for doing such a miserable job.

                      2) If the project is a success: pad yourself on the shoulder (and make sure others will notice it) for picking the best man for the job.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Knuth Konrad View Post
                        1) If the project fails: blame the terrible consultant for doing such a miserable job.
                        Not an option unless done very early on. The hirer failed too - failed to select the right person, and/or failed to take account of the risk of failure and its consequences.

                        2) If the project is a success: pad yourself on the shoulder (and make sure others will notice it) for picking the best man for the job.
                        Very dangerous. The consultant may be retained, in which case you have created a knowledgeable rival!

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                        • #13
                          >If the project fails: blame the terrible consultant for doing such a miserable job.
                          >...
                          > If the project is a success: pad yourself on the shoulder

                          I don't know if he coined the phrase or simply quoted it, bur President John F. Kennedy was famously noted for commenting after the Bay of Pigs fiasco, "Victory has many fathers but defeat is an orphan."
                          Michael Mattias
                          Tal Systems Inc.
                          Racine WI USA
                          mmattias@talsystems.com
                          http://www.talsystems.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Michael Mattias View Post
                            I don't know if he coined the phrase or simply quoted it
                            the latter.
                            Last edited by Chris Holbrook; 8 Mar 2012, 01:27 PM.

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