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ODBC TEXT driver - syntax for SELECT using individual fieldnames

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  • #41
    Stuart,
    Thanks for confirming that the underbar is not a special character, and that TSV is not an acceptable extension. These clarifications are helpful toward future decisions I'll have to make regarding changes to the program that creates the log file I'm currently querying... While my file formats are OK, my file naming "standard conventions" need upgrading.

    Eric,
    That link is great to know about! I wish I'd come across it weeks ago! Of all the pages I read none contained comprehensive info like that. I've got to improve my search terms.


    With regard to the last few posts about DSN on x64 systems, I am not so clear. What I think it says:
    You can use a datasource connection string using settings similar to those shown, OR you can use a full DSN with those settings.
    However, IF 1) the program is running on a 64-bit system, AND 2) the DSN was created manually with the x64 ODBC Admin, THEN
    your connection string can simply point to the DSN.

    If there's some other meaning, I'm not getting it... (but that's nothing new!)

    -John

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    • #42
      [deleted]
      "Not my circus, not my monkeys."

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      • #43
        Originally posted by John Montenigro View Post
        With regard to the last few posts about DSN on x64 systems, I am not so clear. What I think it says:
        You can use a datasource connection string using settings similar to those shown, OR you can use a full DSN with those settings.
        However, IF 1) the program is running on a 64-bit system, AND 2) the DSN was created manually with the x64 ODBC Admin, THEN
        your connection string can simply point to the DSN.

        It's not a matter of whether you are running on an x64 machine, It's a matter of whether you are running 32 or 64 bit software.

        Any 32 bit application including a PB application, MS Office 32bit etc requires a DSN or connection string using a 32 bit ODBC driver.
        Any 64 bit application requires a DSN or connection string using a 64 bit ODBC driver.

        In the event that you have a specific driver installed that has both 32bit and 64bit versions, Windows will automagically use the correct one.
        If you only have a 32bit driver installed, you can't use it with a 64bit application (and vice versa)

        Good luck finding a "Microsoft Text Driver" in the 64bit ODBC administrator
        I think you will find you need to use the "Microsoft Access Text Driver" for 64 bit applications, and it will not be installed on many machines, you need to have installed 64 bIt MS Office or the MS Access Engine Redistributable. If you need it for something other than PB, see here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=13255


        Here's a comparison of what I see with the 32bit and 64 bit ODBC administrator.
        (no 64 bit "Text" or "Access text" driver since I use Office 32 and haven't needed to instal the 64 bit re-distributable yet.)
        You will that I have both 32 bit and 64 bit SQL Server drivers but lots of 32 bit only drivers for other data types (there are actually 32 entries in that 32 bit driver list)

        Click image for larger version  Name:	ODBC drivers.jpg Views:	0 Size:	209.2 KB ID:	786827

        Added: If you scroll to the right in those windows, you will see the name of the actual driver file.
        On my machine, the Text driver is ODBCJT32.DLL (looking at several other entries, it seems that the JT stands for "Jet", so the text driver is using the same driver for Access (.mdb), DBase, Excel, Paradox, Text, Visual Foxpro even though there are separate entries in the the driver list for these data sources.

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